English version

depreciate

From Longman Dictionary of Contemporary Englishdepreciatede‧pre‧ci‧ate /dɪˈpriːʃieɪt/ verb 🔊 🔊 1 [intransitive]VALUE to decrease in value or price opp appreciate 🔊 New cars depreciate in value quickly.2 [transitive] technical to reduce the value of something over time, especially for tax purposes 🔊 Company computers are depreciated at 50% per year.3 [transitive] formalIMPORTANT# to make something seem unimportant 🔊 those who depreciate the importance of art in education→ See Verb table
Examples from the Corpus
depreciateJust how much people will switch out of sterling depends on how much they think the exchange rate will depreciate.These notes are postmarked from countries where the dollar has just gotten weaker, or depreciated.His call reflects concern that other currencies could depreciate against the euro, leading to strains among the 15 member states.By depreciating against the other currencies as needed, the scavenger currency would insulate them from this local depression.A new car depreciates more quickly than a second-hand one.And you could depreciate one-eighth of your tax basis in your home.The entire cost of an asset is depreciated over a period of years.New cars depreciate quickly in the first two years.US investors anticipate that the Deutschmark will, in the long term, depreciate relative to the dollar.It is clear from the data that the dollar began to depreciate steadily after March 1985.Thus, the United States government might attempt to depreciate the dollar when our economy is in recession.Dana depreciates the value of his relationships with his friends in his poetry.For other assets there is no provision, statutory or professional, to depreciate them.
From Longman Business Dictionarydepreciatede‧pre‧ci‧ate /dɪˈpriːʃieɪt/ verb1[intransitive] to decrease in value over a period of timeIf you don’t get your car serviced regularly, it will depreciate quickly.2[intransitive, transitive]FINANCE if a currency depreciates, it goes down in value compared to the currencies of other countriesPeople will switch to dollars, depending on how much they think the exchange rate will depreciate.Mexico’s central bank was committed to depreciating the peso by no more than 6.6% against the dollar.3[transitive]ACCOUNTINGTAXLAW to reduce the value of a FIXED ASSET over the particular period of time allowed under tax lawOther fixed assets are depreciated on a straight line basis at annual rates which vary according to the class of asset.→ See Verb table
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Verb table
depreciate
Simple Form
Present
I, you, we, theydepreciate
he, she, itdepreciates
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Past
I, you, he, she, it, we, theydepreciated
Present perfect
I, you, we, theyhave depreciated
he, she, ithas depreciated
Past perfect
I, you, he, she, it, we, theyhad depreciated
Future
I, you, he, she, it, we, theywill depreciate
Future perfect
I, you, he, she, it, we, theywill have depreciated
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Continuous Form
Present
Iam depreciating
he, she, itis depreciating
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you, we, theyare depreciating
Past
I, he, she, itwas depreciating
you, we, theywere depreciating
Present perfect
I, you, we, theyhave been depreciating
he, she, ithas been depreciating
Past perfect
I, you, he, she, it, we, theyhad been depreciating
Future
I, you, he, she, it, we, theywill be depreciating
Future perfect
I, you, he, she, it, we, theywill have been depreciating
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