English version

differentiate

From Longman Dictionary of Contemporary Englishdifferentiatedif‧fe‧ren‧ti‧ate /ˌdɪfəˈrenʃieɪt/ ●○○ AWL verb  1 [intransitive, transitive]DIFFERENT to recognize or express the difference between things or people syn distinguishdifferentiate between It’s important to differentiate between fact and opinion.differentiate something from something It’s sometimes hard to differentiate one sample from another.2 [transitive]DIFFERENT to be the quality, feature etc that makes one thing or person clearly different from another syn distinguish What differentiates these two periods of history?differentiate something from something Its unusual nesting habits differentiate this bird from others.3 [intransitive]DIFFERENT to behave differently towards someone or something, especially in an unfair way syn discriminatedifferentiate between a policy which differentiates between men and womendifferentiation /ˌdɪfərenʃiˈeɪʃən/ noun [uncountable] socio-economic differentiation→ See Verb table
Examples from the Corpus
differentiateDolphin sounds are unintelligible to humans, and cover a larger range of frequencies than we can hear or differentiate.Such a structure requires that aims and objectives are explicit and differentiated.As journalists, we have to differentiate between facts and opinions.Vygotsky differentiated between what he called the zone of actual development and the zone of proximal development.We must also understand how to differentiate between what should be remembered and what should be forgotten.Part of the Management course was teaching us how to differentiate essential tasks from less important ones.Traditionally, domestic policy was sharply differentiated from foreign policy.Circular temples are often difficult to identify unless they are clearly differentiated from their domestic counterparts.The leaves are of diverse shapes, simple to compound, differentiated into petiole and blade.These prerogatives are what differentiate organizational owners from the members of other constituent groups.differentiate betweenTheir religion does not differentiate between the rich and poor.Most people couldn't differentiate between the two types of soft drink.
From Longman Business Dictionarydifferentiatedif‧fe‧ren‧ti‧ate /ˌdɪfəˈrenʃieɪt/ verb [transitive] MARKETING when a company differentiates its products, it shows how they are different from each other and from competing products, for example in its advertising. This is done to show buyers the advantages of one product over anotherdifferentiate betweenIt’s difficult for computer makers to differentiate between the technical features of their product and someone else’s.differentiate something from somethingThe only viable strategy was to differentiate Citibank credit cards from all the low-cost alternatives.→ See Verb table
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Verb table
differentiate
Simple Form
Present
I, you, we, theydifferentiate
he, she, itdifferentiates
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Past
I, you, he, she, it, we, theydifferentiated
Present perfect
I, you, we, theyhave differentiated
he, she, ithas differentiated
Past perfect
I, you, he, she, it, we, theyhad differentiated
Future
I, you, he, she, it, we, theywill differentiate
Future perfect
I, you, he, she, it, we, theywill have differentiated
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Continuous Form
Present
Iam differentiating
he, she, itis differentiating
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you, we, theyare differentiating
Past
I, he, she, itwas differentiating
you, we, theywere differentiating
Present perfect
I, you, we, theyhave been differentiating
he, she, ithas been differentiating
Past perfect
I, you, he, she, it, we, theyhad been differentiating
Future
I, you, he, she, it, we, theywill be differentiating
Future perfect
I, you, he, she, it, we, theywill have been differentiating
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