Longman Dictionary of Contemporary English homepage

Language: Old English
Origin:

dim

1 adjective
     
dim1 comparative dimmer, superlative dimmest
1

dark

fairly dark or not giving much light, so that you cannot see well [≠ bright]:
in the dim light of the early dawn
a dim glow
2

shape

a dim shape is one which is not easy to see because it is too far away, or there is not enough light:
The dim outline of a building loomed up out of the mist.
3

take a dim view of something

to disapprove of something:
Miss Watson took a dim view of Paul's behaviour.
4

dim recollection/awareness etc

a memory or understanding of something that is not clear in your mind [= vague]:
Laura had a dim recollection of someone telling her this before.
5

eyes

literary dim eyes are weak and cannot see well:
Isaac was old and his eyes were dim.
6

future chances

if your chances of success in the future are dim, they are not good:
Prospects for an early settlement of the dispute are dim.
7

in the dim and distant past

a very long time ago - used humorously
8

not intelligent

informal not intelligent:
You can be really dim sometimes!
dimly adverb:
a dimly lit room
She was only dimly aware of the risk.
dimness noun [uncountable]

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