English version

discriminate

From Longman Dictionary of Contemporary Englishdiscriminatedi‧scrim‧i‧nate /dɪˈskrɪməneɪt/ ●○○ AWL verb 🔊 🔊 1 [intransitive]SARUNFAIR to treat a person or group differently from another in an unfair waydiscriminate against 🔊 Under federal law, it is illegal to discriminate against minorities and women.discriminate on the grounds/basis of something 🔊 It was found that the company still discriminated on the basis of race in promotions.2 [intransitive, transitive]DIFFERENT to recognize a difference between things syn differentiatediscriminate between 🔊 Newborn babies can discriminate between a man’s and a woman’s voice.discriminate something from something 🔊 the process of learning to discriminate fact from opinion→ See Verb table
Examples from the Corpus
discriminateIt is, of course, necessary to check carefully and individually the size of type that a visually impaired pupil can discriminate.It also defies basic standards of fairness by discriminating against large numbers of minority students.In addition there are a number of ways in which the social security system directly discriminates against older people.Both county and federal governments were taking tax dollars out of my pocket and using them to discriminate against other women.Barring a compelling reason, governments should not discriminate between classes of citizens.Ii also find it appalling that the commission should discriminate between farmers so blatantly.The monkeys were easily able to discriminate between the different objects, according to their visual appearance.Agencies and landlords are not legally allowed to discriminate on grounds of race but ways are invariably found around this.A test is useful for discriminating those students who have reached a higher level from those at a lower level.discriminate on the grounds/basis of somethingInfants do not discriminate on the basis of age.The employer is only allowed to discriminate on the basis of personal merit and suitability for the job.They frequently discriminate on the basis of race, religion or national origin.discriminate something from somethingThe parties have become so similar it is difficult to discriminate Republicans from Democrats.
From Longman Business Dictionarydiscriminatedi‧scrim‧i‧nate /dɪˈskrɪməneɪt/ verb [intransitive]HUMAN RESOURCESLAW to behave unfairly towards one group of people or one type of company or productdiscriminate againstemployment practices that discriminate against womenThe court ruled that the state’s highway-use tax discriminated in favor of trucking companies based in Arkansas and against companies based in other states.→ See Verb table
Pictures of the day
Do you know what each of these is called?
Click on the pictures to check.
Verb table
discriminate
Simple Form
Present
I, you, we, theydiscriminate
he, she, itdiscriminates
> View More
Past
I, you, he, she, it, we, theydiscriminated
Present perfect
I, you, we, theyhave discriminated
he, she, ithas discriminated
Past perfect
I, you, he, she, it, we, theyhad discriminated
Future
I, you, he, she, it, we, theywill discriminate
Future perfect
I, you, he, she, it, we, theywill have discriminated
> View Less
Continuous Form
Present
Iam discriminating
he, she, itis discriminating
> View More
you, we, theyare discriminating
Past
I, he, she, itwas discriminating
you, we, theywere discriminating
Present perfect
I, you, we, theyhave been discriminating
he, she, ithas been discriminating
Past perfect
I, you, he, she, it, we, theyhad been discriminating
Future
I, you, he, she, it, we, theywill be discriminating
Future perfect
I, you, he, she, it, we, theywill have been discriminating
> View Less