English version

disfavour

From Longman Dictionary of Contemporary Englishdisfavourdis‧fa‧vour British English, disfavor American English /dɪsˈfeɪvə $ -ər/ noun [uncountable] 🔊 🔊 DISAPPROVEa feeling of dislike and disapproval opp favourwith disfavour 🔊 The job creation programme is looked upon with disfavour by the local community. 🔊 Coal fell into disfavour because burning it caused pollution.
Examples from the Corpus
disfavourAs a result various things, such as missionary work, now fall under a word which directs disfavour at them.Ageing by sutures has now fallen into disfavour.Coal fell into disfavour on the grounds that steam engines are noisy, polluting and only 5 percent efficient.Those erecting barriers on the grounds of economy courted political disfavour.The Basset connection brought Richard less profitable consequences in 1233, when Gilbert Basset fell under royal disfavour.She sat down at the table and looked with disfavour at the glass in front of her.Although he had been forewarned, Rostov eyed the vessel with disfavour.fell into disfavourCoal fell into disfavour on the grounds that steam engines are noisy, polluting and only 5 percent efficient.
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