English version

dishonour

From Longman Dictionary of Contemporary Englishdishonourdis‧hon‧our1 British English, dishonor American English /dɪsˈɒnə $ -ˈɑːnər/ noun [uncountable]  ADMIREloss of respect from other people, because you have behaved in a morally unacceptable way opp honour You’ve brought enough dishonour on your family already without causing any more trouble.see thesaurus at shame
Examples from the Corpus
dishonourThere was, however, no dishonour in such a defeat.The implications of dishonour can be very serious.Anxious to escape the limelight of dishonour, Cleave returns to live alone in his dilapidated childhood home.She analysed each member of this roll of dishonour, looking for the 13 hallmarks of weediness.He may have brought only dishonour to the name of the county but his involvement in the massacre should not be forgotten.He hoped they could come to an arrangement which would prevent the dishonour of his claiming its protection.Or what nunnery would take you, in your dishonour?
dishonourdishonour2 British English, dishonor American English verb [transitive]  1 formalASHAMED to make your family, country, profession etc lose the respect of other people He dishonored the uniform and did not deserve to be a marine.2 BFBif a bank dishonours a cheque, it refuses to pay out money for it opp honour3 to refuse to keep an agreement or promise opp honour Union leaders accused management of dishonouring existing pay agreements.→ See Verb table
Examples from the Corpus
dishonourFirst, the cheque which Y had given X when Y took delivery of the car from X, was dishonoured.But there is another, more essential respect for nature itself, which we dishonour at our peril.Ham dishonours his drunken father, and Noah curses him through his descendants.Thus a seller who in the normal way has accepted a cheque which is later dishonoured, is an unpaid seller.The identification of feminism with the United States has dishonoured it around the world.In the first three months of 1987 a number of the company's cheques were dishonoured on presentation.When the cheque was dishonoured the seller did all he could to trace the rogue and car and he informed the police.
From Longman Business Dictionarydishonourdis‧hon‧our /dɪsˈɒnə-ˈɑːnər/ British English, dishonor American English verb [transitive]1BANKINGif a bank dishonours a cheque, it refuses to pay out money for it, usually because the person who has written it does not have enough money in their accountThe law is that people who obtain goods by presenting a cheque which they know will be dishonoured are not guilty of theft.2FINANCE if someone dishonours a BILL OF EXCHANGE, they do not accept it when it is presented, or do not pay it after they have accepted it→ See Verb table
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Verb table
dishonour (BrE)
Simple Form
Present
I, you, we, theydishonour (BrE)
he, she, itdishonours (BrE)
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Past
I, you, he, she, it, we, theydishonoured (BrE)
Present perfect
I, you, we, theyhave dishonoured
he, she, ithas dishonoured
Past perfect
I, you, he, she, it, we, theyhad dishonoured
Future
I, you, he, she, it, we, theywill dishonour
Future perfect
I, you, he, she, it, we, theywill have dishonoured
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Continuous Form
Present
Iam dishonouring
he, she, itis dishonouring
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you, we, theyare dishonouring
Past
I, he, she, itwas dishonouring
you, we, theywere dishonouring
Present perfect
I, you, we, theyhave been dishonouring
he, she, ithas been dishonouring
Past perfect
I, you, he, she, it, we, theyhad been dishonouring
Future
I, you, he, she, it, we, theywill be dishonouring
Future perfect
I, you, he, she, it, we, theywill have been dishonouring
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