English version

disincentive

From Longman Dictionary of Contemporary Englishdisincentivedis‧in‧cen‧tive /ˌdɪsənˈsentɪv/ noun [countable]  PERSUADEsomething that makes people less willing to do something opp incentivedisincentive to (doing/do) something High interest rates can be a disincentive to expanding a business.
Examples from the Corpus
disincentiveFor a buyer, the implication of fast-paced change may be a disincentive to prolong a search process.Firstly, fundholding practices may find their obligation to buy community care services a disincentive from pressing for early discharge.Raising taxes on unearned income would be a major disincentive to saving and investment.It would be a major disincentive to property improvement.If anything, they again pointed to a slight disincentive of higher taxes.We're trying to attract more graduates into nursing, but the salary and hours are strong disincentives.On top of this disincentive a second system of rougher targets and penalties was introduced, based on a council's previous spending.In fact, there were disincentives for improvement since rewards to support function managers came for increased size and complexity.The excessive concern with disincentive effects has resulted in a less equitable system of taxation.disincentive to (doing/do) somethingMr. Nicholas Winterton Does my hon. Friend accept that high interest rates are a disincentive to investment?For a buyer, the implication of fast-paced change may be a disincentive to prolong a search process.It would be a major disincentive to property improvement.One motivation for the reform was the perceived disincentive to labour market participation generated by the current benefit rules.Certain forces may represent disincentives to search.She examined the body as best she could without touching it, its contorted features being a suitable disincentive to touch it.As a result the disincentive to marriage was removed.Cheap fares were available only for the westward journey, so that the disincentive to return to the East was considerable.
From Longman Business Dictionarydisincentivedis‧in‧cen‧tive /ˌdɪsɪnˈsentɪv/ noun [countable]HUMAN RESOURCES something that makes people less willing to do somethingdisincentive toHigh interest rates are a disincentive to expanding a business.disincentive forThe present government policies provide serious disincentives for employment.
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