English version

disuse

From Longman Dictionary of Contemporary Englishdisusedis‧use /dɪsˈjuːs/ noun [uncountable] 🔊 🔊 USE somethinga situation in which something is no longer used 🔊 The building eventually fell into disuse.
Examples from the Corpus
disuseNow the workforce has shrunk to less than a thousand, and much of the plant is in disuse.It was a commentary on heroism and how it has fallen into disuse.The National Association of Gay Switchboards has fallen into disuse.The railway tracks were lifted in the 1960s, and the bridge fell into disuse.As a result there was water, water everywhere except in the Bath House, which fell into disuse and subsequently burned.Following a period of disuse, its machinery and water wheel were removed.Through simple disuse and lack of feedback, she may stop conjuring up stories.The pattern is allowed to atrophy through disuse.fell into disuseThe railway tracks were lifted in the 1960s, and the bridge fell into disuse.It was originally a public well, but fell into disuse in the late sixteenth-century.In fact there were complaints from upper crust visitors about the din, so the cells fell into disuse.Because of the problems with false prophecy, the gift of prophecy itself eventually fell into disuse and sometimes disrepute.A lot of farmland fell into disuse during the war.This and all the other alternative orifices fell into disuse.Eventually these theories fell into disuse, largely because they were unable to explain the whole range of different types of learning.Early in 1922 the tramway fell into disuse for the second and final time.As a result there was water, water everywhere except in the Bath House, which fell into disuse and subsequently burned.
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