English version

divert

From Longman Dictionary of Contemporary English
Related topics: Leisure
divertdi‧vert /daɪˈvɜːt, də- $ -ɜːrt/ ●○○ verb [transitive]  1 CHANGE FROM ONE THING TO ANOTHERto change the use of something such as time or moneydivert something into/to/(away) from etc something The company should divert more resources into research. Officials diverted revenue from arms sales to the rebels.2 to change the direction in which something travelsdivert a river/footpath/road etc Canals divert water from the Truckee River into the lake. The high street is closed and traffic is being diverted.3 if you divert your telephone calls, you arrange for them to go directly to another number, for example because you are not able to answer them yourself for some time Remember to divert your phone when you are out of the office.4 ATTENTIONCRITICIZEto deliberately take someone’s attention from something by making them think about or notice other thingsdivert (somebody’s) attention (away from somebody/something) The crime crackdown is an attempt to divert attention from social problems. He’d been trying to divert suspicion away from himself.5 formalDL to amuse or entertain someone
→ See Verb table
Examples from the Corpus
divertAccording to Williams, Woods intervened at that point and announced that no funds would be diverted.The software then diverts all output across the network to the printer on the other machine.We heard that he was accusing us of diverting all the water on to his field.Environmentalists keep quiet because concern over radon in houses would divert attention from the campaign against nuclear power.In all, $ 2.2 million in federal funds was illegally diverted by those convicted, prosecutors said.What if unlimited water should be diverted from the two cascades by power-hungry industrialists and power-hungry governments?Traffic was diverted on to the A166 as emergency services cleared the wreckage between Dunnington and Kexby, near York.Bring games in the car to divert the children during a long trip.Shrub roses were trussed to let people pass; signs erected to divert visitors from the non-scenic compost heap.Farmers were illegally diverting water to save their crops.divert ... resourcesLocal NGOs thus divert resources and personnel out of the public health services.For years Dieter had diverted resources away from the army and into his own pocket.This emphasis tends to divert scarce financial resources from true development objectives.Local economic development strategies divert attention and resources of government away from direct efforts to resolve social problems. 7.traffic ... divertedCars from London terminated at Thornton Heath Pond and all other traffic was diverted.Traffic was diverted along the A69 and through Tedale.Traffic was diverted on to the A166 as emergency services cleared the wreckage between Dunnington and Kexby, near York.The town itself, not very large, has been preserved in the centre and the traffic diverted round the outside.All A66 traffic will be diverted through the village of Sadberge.All east bound traffic was diverted until noon.Traffic will be diverted via Boroughbridge Road and Shipton.divert (somebody’s) attention (away from somebody/something)It was easy to miss, especially with the village to divert one's attention.Then an acquaintance started talking to me and diverted my attention.She struggled, screamed and was cut a second time in the neck but managed to divert his attention and flee.Local economic development strategies divert attention and resources of government away from direct efforts to resolve social problems. 7.Concern about sea-level rise must not be allowed to divert attention from other problems caused by the increase of coastal populations.Computer and other technical problems diverted commander attention from the battlefield.Forbes responded that this is an attempt by his rivals to divert attention from the issues.That's another way of saying that people have little to divert their attention in restrooms.
From Longman Business Dictionarydivertdi‧vert /daɪˈvɜːt, də--ɜːrt/ verb [transitive]COMMERCE to spend money or make an effort in a new area of business or a new productdivert something intoThe company should divert more resources into research.→ See Verb table
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Verb table
divert
Simple Form
Present
I, you, we, theydivert
he, she, itdiverts
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Past
I, you, he, she, it, we, theydiverted
Present perfect
I, you, we, theyhave diverted
he, she, ithas diverted
Past perfect
I, you, he, she, it, we, theyhad diverted
Future
I, you, he, she, it, we, theywill divert
Future perfect
I, you, he, she, it, we, theywill have diverted
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Continuous Form
Present
Iam diverting
he, she, itis diverting
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you, we, theyare diverting
Past
I, he, she, itwas diverting
you, we, theywere diverting
Present perfect
I, you, we, theyhave been diverting
he, she, ithas been diverting
Past perfect
I, you, he, she, it, we, theyhad been diverting
Future
I, you, he, she, it, we, theywill be diverting
Future perfect
I, you, he, she, it, we, theywill have been diverting
> View Less