English version

escheat

From Longman Dictionary of Contemporary Englishescheates‧cheat /ɪsˈtʃiːt/ noun [countable] American English law 🔊 🔊 a legal process in which someone’s money and property are given to the state after they die if they do not have a will, or if there is nobody else with a legal right to receive their money or property
Examples from the Corpus
escheatThe abolition of escheat has meant the abolition of the last of the practical consequences of free tenure.
From Longman Business Dictionaryescheates‧cheat /ɪsˈtʃiːt/ noun [uncountable] LAW a legal process in which someone’s money and property are given to the state after they die if they do not have a will, or if there is nobody else with a legal right to receive their money or propertyBy the old doctrine of escheat, states and municipalities may capture unclaimed and dormant bank deposits.escheatment noun [uncountable]
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