English version

exchange

From Longman Dictionary of Contemporary English
Related topics: Economics, Military
exchangeex‧change1 /ɪksˈtʃeɪndʒ/ ●●○ S3 W3 noun  1 giving/receiving [countable, uncountable]EXCHANGE the act of giving someone something and receiving something else from themexchange of an exchange of political prisonersin exchange for something I’ve offered to paint the kitchen in exchange for a week’s accommodation. Four of my cassettes for your Madonna CD is a fair exchange. part exchange2 argument/discussion [countable]ARGUE a short conversation, usually between two people who are angry with each other a quiet exchange between the judge and the clerk The DJ was fired after a heated exchange (=a very angry conversation) on air with a call-in listener.3 exchange of ideas/information etc4 something you buy [countable] the act of giving something you have bought back to the store where you bought it, for example because it does not work, fit etc, and taking something else instead The store’s policy is not to allow returns or exchanges.5 moneyPE [uncountable] a process in which you change money from one currency to another Most capital cities have extensive exchange facilities.6 students/teachers [countable]VISIT an arrangement in which a student, teacher etc visits another school or university to work or studyon an exchange (with somebody) I’m here for one term, on an exchange with Dr. Fisher.7 jobs/homes etc [countable] an arrangement in which you stay in someone’s home, do someone’s job etc for a short time while that person stays in your home, does your job etc Kate’s in New York on an employee exchange so she can get some more training.8 fight [countable]PMFIGHT an event during a war or fight when two people, armies etc shoot or fire missiles at each otherexchange of fire/gunfire9 corn/wool/cotton etc exchangeCOLLOCATIONSMeaning 2: a short conversation, usually between two people who are angry with each otheradjectivesa brief exchange (=a short conversation)There followed a brief exchange between Mitti and Helga in German.an angry exchangeHis angry exchange with the referee earned him a yellow card.a heated exchange (=a very angry conversation)I overheard a heated exchange between John and his wife.an acrimonious exchange formal (=in which people show their anger and criticize each other)The newspaper article led to a series of acrimonious exchanges between leading scientists.a sharp exchange (=one that shows someone disapproves of something or is annoyed)The proposed bill provoked some sharp exchanges in the House of Commons.a bitter exchange (=one in which people criticize each other with strong feelings of hate and anger)There were bitter exchanges between them outside the court room.a verbal exchange (=spoken rather than written)The two boxers recently became involved in a heated verbal exchange.COLLOCATIONSMeaning 5: a process in which you change money from one currency to anotherADJECTIVES/NOUN + exchange currency exchangeWe have seen wide fluctuations in rates of currency exchange this year.foreign exchange (=money in the currency of a foreign country, that a country gets by selling goods abroad)Timber is a vital source of foreign exchange earnings for the country.exchange + NOUNthe exchange rateWhat's the current exchange rate between the dollar and the euro?an exchange market (=a financial market where different currencies are bought and sold)The pound rose against the dollar on the world foreign currency exchange markets.exchange controls (=limits on the amount of a currency people are allowed to exchange)The government is going to impose stricter exchange controls.COLLOCATIONSMeaning 6: an arrangement in which a student, teacher etc visits another school or university to work or studyADJECTIVES/NOUN + exchange a student exchangeOur college arranged student exchanges with four colleges in France.a staff exchangeThe staff exchange programme allows the company to share personnel with partner institutions abroad.a cultural/scientific/academic exchangeThe mayors of Tokyo and New York signed an agreement to encourage cultural exchanges between the cities.
Examples from the Corpus
exchangeSale goods can be brought back to the store for an exchange or store credit.an exchange of gunfireDuring angry exchanges in Parliament the Prime Minister said he would not change existing policies.That will become especially important in the coming global battle between exchanges for international securities-trading business.a commodities exchangeA series of heated exchanges between the two governments followed.In any negotiations there must be an honest exchange of information.It is well within reason to expect help in this regard in exchange for further financial assistance.In the case of exchanges it usually translates into a general contractual duty to act fairly.It was obvious to me that they had been here before and that they were enjoying the exchange.A further cause could result from the exchange of gas in and out of the bladder.The exchange of prisoners took place on a bridge over the Mekong river.exchange ofCollins had a brief exchange of words with some reporters.Negotiators are considering the exchange of land for peace.heated exchangeHe had heard a heated exchange between Day and William Tidbury while they were in custody at Newbury.Stevens and Golding at one point yesterday got into a heated exchange over remarks Stevens claimed Golding made last week.That wasn't a truth he wanted to hear so there was quite a heated exchange.Ken Clarke, having listened to one of our more heated exchanges, wondered if we would ever speak to each other again.She was an only child and hated her parents' heated exchanges.Welch and I had a rather heated exchange about the appropriateness of his editorial interference, which had caught me by surprise.For a few minutes there were heated exchanges between the two.on an exchange (with somebody)Nigel Lawson's achievements on exchange and interest rates could be the deciding factor.I had been in Moscow the previous December to sign an agreement on exchanges with the Union of Journalists.It needs some sort of collective arrangement on exchange rates.Exports were calculated based on an exchange rate of 123.77 yen in February against 125.59 a year ago.Indeed, on an exchange, rules may often evolve out of practice, rather than viceversa.Pressure on exchange rates in late 1989 resulted in calls for currency stabilization on the part of the leading industrialized countries.Many firms do them on an exchange basis.exchange of fire/gunfireThe police are claiming they were killed in an exchange of fire.
exchangeexchange2 ●●○ verb [transitive]  1 EXCHANGE a) to give someone something and receive the same kind of thing from them at the same time We exchange gifts at Christmas. At the end of the game, players traditionally exchange shirts with each other. We exchanged phone numbers. b) EXCHANGEto give someone something and receive something different from them syn changeexchange something for something Where can I exchange my dollars for pounds?RegisterIn everyday British English, people usually say swap or, in everyday American English, trade, rather than exchange:Do you want to swap (British English)/trade (American English) seats with me?2 to replace one thing with another syn swapexchange something for something He exchanged the black jacket for a blue one.3 exchange words/looks etc (with somebody)4 exchange blows (with somebody)5 exchange information/ideas etc6 exchange contractsexchangeable adjectiveTHESAURUSexchange to give something to someone, and receive a similar thing from them at the same time. Exchange is often used about people telling each other about their ideas, phone numbers, addresses etcThey exchanged photographs before they met.a place where people can exchange ideasWe exchanged email addresses.if you are unhappy with the jacket, you can always take it back and exchange it for another one.These coupons can be exchanged for meals and accommodation. change to exchange something, especially money. Also used in British English about exchanging something you have bought for something differentI need to change some dollars. She changed all her money into euros.We thought it was time we changed our car for something more modern. swap (also do a swap BrE) informal to give something to someone, who gives you something similarThe two schools use the Internet to swap pictures, stories, and jokes.I like your room better – do you want to do a swap? trade (also do a trade American English) to exchange something that you have for something that someone else hasThe stolen phones are being traded for drugs. The boys trade sports cards on the playground.We've got lots of plants we don't need – do you want to do a trade?switch to change the places of two or more people or things, so that each one is in the place the other was beforeCan I switch seats with you?reciprocate to do or give something, because someone has done or given something similar to you – a rather formal useThey invited us to dinner a while ago, and I'd like to reciprocate.in exchange/return (for something) if you give something in exchange or in return for something else, you give it in order to get something else backWilliams will plead guilty in exchange for a reduced sentence.→ See Verb table
Examples from the Corpus
exchangeFirst Bank System has offered to exchange 2. 6 of its shares for each First Interstate share in the proposed acquisition.Did you exchange any money before your trip?Grant rode down to the river to exchange congratulations with Admiral Porter on their joint victory.Foreign currency can be exchanged for sterling at any bank.My family still exchanges gifts at Christmas.As Sally approached wearing her new dress, the others exchanged glances and tried not to laugh.The two men were exchanging insults and accusing each other of mismanagement.This shirt is too big. Can I exchange it?None of the passengers exchanged names and addresses-they were too distraught.We exchanged phone numbers, but I don't think I'll call him.The volunteer returned once a week to ask the patient if he or she wanted to exchange the prints for others.Sometimes the food they bring runs out and they have to exchange their precious maize for a few mangoes.I would be glad to exchange them for the same face value as the increasingly worthless and derisory folding stuff.I wish to exchange this flash-of-lightning faith for continuous daylight, this fever-glow for a benign climate.Danny and his lawyer exchanged uneasy looks.Bellamy exchanged wild shots with MacLane as we left the captain in the middle of the road.exchange something for somethingI need to exchange these dollars for pesos.In 1960 a trade agreement was made to exchange Cuban sugar for Soviet oil.
From Longman Business Dictionaryexchangeex‧change1 /ɪksˈtʃeɪndʒ/ noun1[countable]FINANCE a market where goods, services, or shares are bought and sold, in return for moneythe London International Financial Futures Exchangethe London Metal Exchange commodity exchange futures exchange mercantile exchange options exchange stock exchange2COMMERCE corn/wool/cotton exchange a large building in a town, that was used in the past for buying and selling corn, wool etcan historic old corn exchange3[uncountable] (also foreign exchange)FINANCE the activity of buying and selling currencies SYN FOREXWe have recently seen the removal of exchange controls (=limits on the amount of currency you are allowed to exchange).huge foreign exchange dealsThey also made healthy profits in their foreign exchange operations. see also exchange rate direct exchange indirect exchange4[uncountable]FINANCE money in the currency of a foreign country, for example money obtained through exportsWhen oil prices were depressed, Mexico made a great effort to promote manufactured exports as an alternative source of foreign exchange.The Suez Canal is one of Egypt’s main foreign exchange earners.5[countable, uncountable] when you accept one thing in return for anotherthe exchange of goods and servicesTickets cannot be accepted back for exchange or re-sale. information exchange6[countable]JOB an arrangement in which two people from different countries, areas etc do each other’s jobs for a period of timeHe was on a six-month exchange at the factory where her father was works manager.exchangeexchange2 verb [transitive]1to give someone something and receive something in returnThe new system allows marketing data as well as orders and invoices to be exchanged.exchange something for somethingAround £2 billion is exchanged for chips in casinos every year.2COMMERCEif a shop or company exchanges something you have bought, they take it back and give you a new one, for example because the thing you first bought has a faultThe store will not exchange goods without a receipt.3if you exchange money, you get money in one currency for money in anotherWhere can I exchange my dollars for pounds?4exchange contracts British EnglishPROPERTY to complete the final stage of buying a house or other property by signing a contract with the person you are buying it fromThe firm had just exchanged contracts on a nine-acre site. see also exchange of contracts→ See Verb table
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Verb table
exchange
Simple Form
Present
I, you, we, theyexchange
he, she, itexchanges
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Past
I, you, he, she, it, we, theyexchanged
Present perfect
I, you, we, theyhave exchanged
he, she, ithas exchanged
Past perfect
I, you, he, she, it, we, theyhad exchanged
Future
I, you, he, she, it, we, theywill exchange
Future perfect
I, you, he, she, it, we, theywill have exchanged
> View Less
Continuous Form
Present
Iam exchanging
he, she, itis exchanging
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you, we, theyare exchanging
Past
I, he, she, itwas exchanging
you, we, theywere exchanging
Present perfect
I, you, we, theyhave been exchanging
he, she, ithas been exchanging
Past perfect
I, you, he, she, it, we, theyhad been exchanging
Future
I, you, he, she, it, we, theywill be exchanging
Future perfect
I, you, he, she, it, we, theywill have been exchanging
> View Less