English version

excise

From Longman Dictionary of Contemporary English
Related topics: Tax
exciseex‧cise1 /ˈeksaɪz/ noun [countable, uncountable]  PETthe government tax that is put on the goods that are produced and used inside a countryexcise officer (=someone who collects excise)excise duty/tax (=the money paid as excise) excise duty on tobacco Customs and Excise
Examples from the Corpus
exciseDelta Air Lines says it is no longer processing airline excise tax refunds for people who bought tickets with a credit card.Chris Luby by day is a customs and excise inspector, by night a Human Aeroplane.Within alcoholic drinks, excise duty revenue from spirits is declining, as its market share falls.The 0.8 p.c. rise in the index between the two months was largely due to changes in excise duty in the Budget.With many excises however, modest price increases have little or 00 effect on sales.If the stamped-in number is too hard to find, check the registration number against the excise licence.It is impossible to say when Congress may re-enact the excise tax.excise officerThe excise officer measures the amount of fermentable material - malt and other sugars - in the wort.
exciseex‧cise2 /ɪkˈsaɪz/ verb [transitive]  formalREMOVE to remove or get rid of something, especially by cutting it out The tumour was excised.excision /ɪkˈsɪʒən/ noun [countable, uncountable]→ See Verb table
Examples from the Corpus
exciseC, the petiole of the cotyledon was chilled as in B, and the cotyledon was then excised.From the point of view of the present, the past has to be excised.The television age has transformed the conventions into presentational exercises from which the unknown and unexpected are ruthlessly excised.That homosexuality has been excised as an official disease state is certainly good news.The audio is livelier than the hard-copy edition, which is so slim that little was excised for the audio presentation.Offensive scenes were excised from the film.It was as if the operation had excised her will to live.Now he could no more excise it from his brain cells than he could sever his past from his future.Therefore, to excise it would not imply any reversal of Britain's opt-out.
From Longman Business Dictionaryexciseex‧cise /ˈeksaɪz/ noun [countable, uncountable]TAX1a government tax that is charged on certain goods that are sold in the country, for example alcoholic drinks and petrolAn excise on home production of tobacco could have produced the same revenue as a tax on imports.The Chancellor decided not to increase excise on whisky.an excise officer (=someone who collects excise)2the Excise in Britain, a group of government officials whose job is to collect excise and some other taxes see also Customs and Excise
Pictures of the day
Do you know what each of these is called?
Click on the pictures to check.
Verb table
excise
Simple Form
Present
I, you, we, theyexcise
he, she, itexcises
> View More
Past
I, you, he, she, it, we, theyexcised
Present perfect
I, you, we, theyhave excised
he, she, ithas excised
Past perfect
I, you, he, she, it, we, theyhad excised
Future
I, you, he, she, it, we, theywill excise
Future perfect
I, you, he, she, it, we, theywill have excised
> View Less
Continuous Form
Present
Iam excising
he, she, itis excising
> View More
you, we, theyare excising
Past
I, he, she, itwas excising
you, we, theywere excising
Present perfect
I, you, we, theyhave been excising
he, she, ithas been excising
Past perfect
I, you, he, she, it, we, theyhad been excising
Future
I, you, he, she, it, we, theywill be excising
Future perfect
I, you, he, she, it, we, theywill have been excising
> View Less