English version

exempt

From Longman Dictionary of Contemporary Englishexemptex‧empt1 /ɪɡˈzempt/ ●○○ adjective  LET/ALLOWnot affected by something, or not having to do it or pay itexempt from The interest is exempt from income tax. Children are exempt from the charges.
Examples from the Corpus
exemptMotorcycles, coaches, minicabs, taxis, school buses and buses for the elderly will also be exempt.Are students exempt from compulsory schooling or from certain courses in the curriculum on religious grounds?This clause allows provinces to be exempt from court rulings for five years.Prisons are exempt from having regular visits from environmental health officers, but in April 1992 this Crown Immunity will be lifted.Negotiators said Wednesday that the main sticking point was still whether the industry should be exempt from paying punitive damages.And, frankly I would be surprised if the majority of readers were completely exempt from such situations.Furthermore, interest on the bonds of state and local governments is exempt from the Federal income tax.We will then let you know whether you are exempt or not as soon as possible. 9.exempt fromTheir income is exempt from state taxes.
exemptexempt2 verb [transitive]  LET/ALLOWto give someone permission not to do or pay somethingexempt somebody from something Charities are exempted from paying the tax. a document that exempts the owner from liability in case of accidentsRegisterIn everyday British English, people usually say let somebody off (doing) something rather than exempt somebody from (doing) something:Living abroad doesn’t necessarily let you off paying tax.→ See Verb table
Examples from the Corpus
exemptCouples filing jointly could exempt $ 26,000 from taxes.Registered companies are exempted from all taxes on approved activities, and no currency or exchange restrictions are imposed.In the 1983 budget, gifts to charities were exempted from capital transfer tax.Florian said, was an engineer who was exempted from military service because of his profession.My father was exempted from military service on the grounds of ill health.The new law exempts people who earn less than $8000 a year from paying any taxes.exempt somebody from somethingDisabled students are exempted from paying the fee.
From Longman Business Dictionaryexemptex‧empt1 /ɪgˈzempt/ verb [transitive]1LAWto allow something that would normally be affected by a tax, law etc not to be affectedDemocrats would also tax the entire cost of private planes, while Republicans would exempt them.exempt something fromThe change in the tax law will exempt dividends from the recipient’s income taxes.2to give permission to someone or to an organization not to do something that they would normally have to doexempt somebody fromThe new rules also exempt established companies from having to comply with all the new safety regulations.→ See Verb tableexemptexempt2 adjective1LAWsomething that is exempt from a law, tax etc is not affected by that law etc when normally it might beexempt fromRestaurant and delicatessen food will be exempt from the labeling requirements.2someone who is exempt from something has special permission not to do itexempt fromStudents are not exempt from compulsory military service.
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Verb table
exempt
Simple Form
Present
I, you, we, theyexempt
he, she, itexempts
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Past
I, you, he, she, it, we, theyexempted
Present perfect
I, you, we, theyhave exempted
he, she, ithas exempted
Past perfect
I, you, he, she, it, we, theyhad exempted
Future
I, you, he, she, it, we, theywill exempt
Future perfect
I, you, he, she, it, we, theywill have exempted
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Continuous Form
Present
Iam exempting
he, she, itis exempting
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you, we, theyare exempting
Past
I, he, she, itwas exempting
you, we, theywere exempting
Present perfect
I, you, we, theyhave been exempting
he, she, ithas been exempting
Past perfect
I, you, he, she, it, we, theyhad been exempting
Future
I, you, he, she, it, we, theywill be exempting
Future perfect
I, you, he, she, it, we, theywill have been exempting
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