English version

expediency

From Longman Dictionary of Contemporary Englishexpediencyex‧pe‧di‧en‧cy /ɪkˈspiːdiənsi/ (also expedience /-diəns/) noun (plural expediencies) [countable, uncountable]  WAY/METHODaction that is quickest or most effective in a particular situation, even if it is morally wrong the ethics of political expediency
Examples from the Corpus
expediencyAnd this production, played on a red-carpeted traverse stage, brings out excellently the mixture of bombast and expediency.But his actions were perhaps not entirely a matter of cynical expediency.The potential for expediency in planning is vast.Dooley made popcorn, and Barnabas did his business at the hedge with great expediency.He would continue to make most of his decisions on the basis of military expediency.It was for Congress to determine the question of expediency.And a system whose first and last resort was all too often expediency.But localised flood prevention solutions often have implications for other areas and political expediency should not determine the solution.The governor vetoed this bill out of political expediency rather than principle.political expediencyWhat are needed are more Mario Cuomos, politicians who are prepared to put moral and practical argument above political expediency.But localised flood prevention solutions often have implications for other areas and political expediency should not determine the solution.This is often a legacy of historic inception, piecemeal development, and political expediency.These rates are clearly a trade-off between economic logic and political expediency.They are politics of political expediency.Now, once again, the thin reed of refugee protection has fallen prey to the winds of political expediency.Perhaps it had been a matter of legal or political expediency.
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