English version

explode

From Longman Dictionary of Contemporary Englishexplodeex‧plode /ɪkˈspləʊd $ -ˈsploʊd/ ●●● W3 verb  1 burst [intransitive, transitive]EXPLODE to burst, or to make something burst, into small pieces, usually with a loud noise and in a way that causes damageexplosion The device was thrown at an army patrol but failed to explode. Far sooner than anyone thought possible, the Russians exploded an atomic bomb.RegisterIn everyday English, people usually say that a bomb goes off rather than explodes:A bomb went off in the city centre.2 increase suddenly [intransitive]INCREASE IN NUMBER OR AMOUNT to suddenly increase greatly in number, amount, or degree syn rocket, → explosion Florida’s population exploded after World War II.3 strong feelings [intransitive]ANGRY to suddenly express strong feelings such as anger explosion Paul exploded. ‘What has it got to do with you?’ he yelled.explode with She exploded with grief and anger. He told a joke which made Hank explode with laughter.explode into He exploded into a screaming, kicking rage.4 become dangerous [intransitive] if a situation explodes, it is suddenly no longer controlled, and is often violent syn blow up Riots may explode at any time.explode into The continued tension could explode into more violence.5 explode the myth6 make a loud noise [intransitive]LOUD/NOISY to make a very loud noiseexplosion A clap of thunder exploded overhead.THESAURUSto explodeexplode verb [intransitive] if a bomb explodes, it bursts suddenly and violently with a loud noiseA bomb exploded in a crowded metro station this morning, killing five people.go off phrasal verb if a bomb goes off, it explodes. Go off is less formal than explode and is the usual phrase to use in everyday EnglishLuckily the station was empty when the bomb went off.As many as ten bombs went off across the city, most of them car bombs. blow up phrasal verb if a building, car, plane etc blows up, it bursts suddenly and violently into pieces, causing a lot of damageThe plane blew up in mid-air, killing all the passengers and crew.In early 1986, a US space shuttle blew up shortly after launch.erupt /ɪˈrʌpt/ verb [intransitive] if a volcano erupts, it explodes and sends smoke and rock into the skyThe volcano has erupted at least fifteen times since 1883.burst verb [intransitive] if something that has air or liquid inside it bursts, it explodes and the air or liquid comes outOne of the water pipes had burst.The plane caught fire after its tyre burst on landing.to make something explodeexplode verb [transitive] to make a bomb burst suddenly and violently with a loud noiseThe terrorists planned to explode a car bomb outside the US embassy.set off phrasal verb to make a bomb explode, either deliberately or accidentally. Set off is less formal than explode and is the usual phrase to use in everyday EnglishThe group set off a bomb outside a crowded cafe in Izmir last September.Police say radio signals were probably used to set the bomb off.detonate /ˈdetəneɪt/ verb [transitive] to make a bomb explode, especially by using special equipment. Detonate is a more technical word than set offArmy experts detonated the bomb safely in a nearby field.The 200 kg bomb was detonated by terrorists using a remote-control device.let off phrasal verb British English to deliberately make a bomb explodeTerrorists let off a bomb in the city centre.The bomb was let off shortly before 3 pm.blow up phrasal verb to make a building, car, plane etc explodeHe was involved in a plot to blow up a passenger jet.He struck a match and blew the whole place up.→ See Verb table
Examples from the Corpus
explodeIf you roll a misfire when you roll the first dice the cannon has literally misfired and may explode.Sly shot a glance at Zimmerman, who was obviously getting ready to explode.Investigators still don't what caused the storage tanks to explode.Seconds after the car crashed, its fuel tank exploded.Another stun grenade was thrown in and a third soldier hurled himself through the window after it, before it had exploded.So far, only the sound of exploding ammo occasionally popped over the sound of the Huey.A fight exploded at the roller-skating rink last Friday."Damn it!" Bill exploded. "Don't push me, Harry."We had one hit with mines and incoming rounds, but we never had one explode, even when pressurized.Firefighters were called when a gas tank exploded in the back yard of a home on Clayton Road.In 1949 the USSR exploded its first atomic bomb."Country music's popularity has exploded, " says Billy Dean.The report explodes the myth that men are bed-hopping rogues.I heard the whoosh, and it exploded to our left.explode intoThe entire room exploded into applause.The audience exploded into laughter.
Pictures of the day
Do you know what each of these is called?
Click on the pictures to check.
Verb table
explode
Simple Form
Present
I, you, we, theyexplode
he, she, itexplodes
> View More
Past
I, you, he, she, it, we, theyexploded
Present perfect
I, you, we, theyhave exploded
he, she, ithas exploded
Past perfect
I, you, he, she, it, we, theyhad exploded
Future
I, you, he, she, it, we, theywill explode
Future perfect
I, you, he, she, it, we, theywill have exploded
> View Less
Continuous Form
Present
Iam exploding
he, she, itis exploding
> View More
you, we, theyare exploding
Past
I, he, she, itwas exploding
you, we, theywere exploding
Present perfect
I, you, we, theyhave been exploding
he, she, ithas been exploding
Past perfect
I, you, he, she, it, we, theyhad been exploding
Future
I, you, he, she, it, we, theywill be exploding
Future perfect
I, you, he, she, it, we, theywill have been exploding
> View Less