Longman Dictionary of Contemporary English homepage

Date: 1400-1500
Language: Latin
Origin: , past participle of extrahere, from trahere 'to pull'

extract

1 verb
     
ex‧tract1 [transitive]
1 formal to remove an object from somewhere, especially with difficulty:
You'll have to have that tooth extracted.
extract something from something
He extracted an envelope from his inside pocket.
2 to carefully remove a substance from something which contains it, using a machine, chemical process etc
extract something from something
Oils are extracted from the plants.
3 to get something which you want from someone, such as information, money, help etc, especially when they do not want to give it to you
extract something from somebody
She had extracted a promise from him.
They used torture to extract information about their families.
4 to take information or a short piece of writing from a book:
We need to extract the relevant financial data.
5 to get an advantage or good thing from a situation
extract something from something
They aim to extract the maximum political benefit from the Games.

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