English version

extrinsic

From Longman Dictionary of Contemporary Englishextrinsicex‧trin‧sic /ekˈstrɪnsɪk, -zɪk/ adjective formal 🔊 🔊 coming from outside or not directly relating to something opp intrinsic 🔊 Staff who complete extra qualifications receive no extrinsic rewards (=no extra money etc). 🔊 a combination of intrinsic and extrinsic factors
Examples from the Corpus
extrinsicTogether, intrinsic and extrinsic ageing will determine apparent age.The gastric mucosa resists the corrosive effects of peptic hydrochloric acid secretion and noxious extrinsic agents.These inducements are both extrinsic and intrinsic.Hygiene factors are essentially extrinsic and motivators are intrinsic.The neural abnormalities that could induce a tachygastria include loss of intrinsic inhibitory innervation or lack of extrinsic autonomic inhibition.Cyclic fluctuations in vole populations have been variously interpreted as the result of intrinsic or extrinsic factors by different workers.Some teachers believe students need extrinsic rewards to motivate them to learn.The aim of his study was to explore why people took part in activities that yielded no extrinsic rewards.Certain actions of football fans, for example, are quite clearly directed by factors extrinsic to their group.extrinsic rewardsThe aim of his study was to explore why people took part in activities that yielded no extrinsic rewards.But what when these extrinsic rewards are in short supply?
From Longman Business Dictionaryextrinsicex‧trin‧sic /ɪkˈstrɪnsɪk, -zɪk/ adjective [only before a noun] formal relating to matters which affect the outer appearance or behaviour of something
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