English version

face

From Longman Dictionary of Contemporary Englishfaceface1 /feɪs/ ●●● S1 W1 noun [countable]  1 front of your headHBHBODY the front part of your head, where your eyes, nose, and mouth are She had a beautiful face. Her face was white with fear. A big smile spread across his face. I felt like punching him in the face.You say that something is on somebody’s face, not ‘in somebody’s face’: You’ve got a mark on your face.2 expressionEXPRESSION ON somebody'S FACE an expression on someone’s face I’ll never forget my father’s face – I’d never seen him so upset before.3 keep a straight face4 pale-faced/round-faced etc5 grim-faced/serious-faced etc6 person a personnew/different face (=someone who you have not seen before) There are a few new faces in class this year. Gordon is a familiar face (=someone who you know or have seen many times before) at the Shrewsbury Flower Show. It’s the same old faces (=people who you see often, especially too often) at our meetings every week.famous/well-known face (=someone who is famous from television, magazines, films etc) She looked around at the sea of faces (=lots of people seen together) in the cafeteria.7 face to face8 say something/tell somebody something to their face9 face down/downwards10 face up/upwards11 in the face of something12 on the face of it13 the face of something14 DNmountain/cliff the face of a mountain, cliff etc is a steep vertical surface or sideface of He fell and died while attempting to climb the north face of Mont Blanc. The cliff face was starting to crumble into the sea. a sheer (=very steep) rock face15 watch.jpg clockTMC the front part of a clock or watch, where the numbers and hands are16 lose face17 save face18 disappear/vanish from/off the face of the earth19 on the face of the earth20 somebody’s face doesn’t fit21 set your face against something22 mineTI the part of a mine from which coal, stone etc is cut coalface23 outside surfaceTBB one of the outside surfaces of an object or building A cube has six faces.24 sportDS the part of a racket or bat etc that you use to hit the ball25 in your face26 get in somebody’s face27 get out of my face28 what’s his face/what’s her face29 put your face on blow up in somebody’s face at blow up, → put on a brave face at brave1(3), → do something till you’re blue in the face at blue1(4), → have egg on your face at egg1(5), → face-to-face, → fly in the face of at fly1(18), → laugh in somebody’s face at laugh1(11), → long face at long1(12), → not just a pretty face at pretty2(4), → show your face at show1(15), → shut your face at shut1(2), → a slap in the face at slap2(2), → be staring somebody in the face at stare1(2), → a straight face at straight2(8), → wipe something off the face of the earth at wipe1(8), → wipe the smile/grin off somebody’s face at wipe1(7), → have something written all over your face at write(10)COLLOCATIONSMeanings 1 & 2adjectivespretty/beautiful/handsome etc Her face was beautiful in the morning light. round/oval/square Her face was round and jolly.thin/narrow Tears rolled down her thin face.pale/darkHis face suddenly became pale and I thought he was going to faint.an angular face (=so thin that you can see the bones)She stared at his dark, angular face.sad/seriousMaggie looked at him with a sad face.happy/smilingShelley looked at the children’s happy faces.a grinning faceHe looked down at the boy’s grinning face.angryBeth’s angry face stared fiercely at her husband.worried/anxiousMy father watched us go with a worried face.puzzledHe looked at his son’s puzzled face.blank/impassive (=showing no emotion or thoughts)What was she really thinking behind that blank face?wrinkled/lined (=with a lot of small lines, especially because of old age)His wrinkled face must once have been handsome.scowling (=showing that you are not pleased about something)He looked around and saw his boss's scowling face behind him.a long face (=an unhappy expression)What’s the long face for?verbssomebody’s face goes/turns red (=becomes red)His face went red with embarrassment.somebody’s face goes/turns pale (=becomes pale)I saw her face go pale when he walked in.somebody’s face lights up/brightens (=they start to look happy)Denise’s face lit up when she heard the news.somebody’s face darkens (=they start to look angry or threatening)She handed him the letter and his face darkened.somebody’s face falls (=they look sad or disappointed)Her face fell when she saw who it was.pull/make a face (=to change your expression to make people laugh or to show you are angry, disappointed etc)Here’s a funny photo of Joe pulling a face.somebody’s face is contorted with anger/rage (=someone’s face is twisted out of its normal shape because they are angry)Eve’s face was contorted with anger as she picked up the broken vase.phrasesa look/expression on somebody’s faceShe had a rather surprised look on her face.I could tell by the look on Dan’s face that he was disappointed.a smile/grin/frown on somebody’s faceThere was a mischievous grin on her face.He was reading the newspaper with a frown on his face.you can see something in somebody’s face (=you know what someone is feeling from the expression on their face)She could see the despair in his face.something is written all over somebody’s face (=their feelings can be seen very clearly in their expression)You’re jealous – it’s written all over your face!you should have seen somebody’s face (=used to say that someone was very angry, surprised etc)You should have seen his face when I told him that I was resigning.a face like thunder (=a very angry expression)The boss had a face like thunder when he arrived this morning.
Examples from the Corpus
faceThe cliff face was starting to crumble into the sea.I could see the children's happy faces.I kissed her face, which was moist and feverish.It's weird, but when she's asleep she looks real young, even though her face is all puffy.One of the victims had scratches all over his face.His face was like wax and his eyes stared like a doll's.His face was a mask, friendly, but in an impersonal way.She is one of the many faces of poverty; she is one of the many faces of the welfare system.There were many unsuccessful attempts to climb the North Face of Mount Everest.We climbed the north face of Mount Rainier.Jodi has such a pretty face.Breeze looked up, meaning to expostulate, but was silenced by what she saw in her sister's face.I want to see dozens and dozens of strange faces.One of the faces of the cube has a line across it.new/different faceNow, board-certified plastic surgeons appear on your television screen to sell you a new face.But there were far too few new faces, and far too many head office honchos.The imposing and inviting new face of the building dominates the prospect of the site by evening.However, this theory largely ignores the process of learning new faces and new identities.It was a Series that produced a stream of new faces to help pull the game toward the new millennium.The new faces do include chat show host Chrystal Rose and Dily Braimoh.north faceMenace lurks in the huge, north facing cliffs of Ben Nevis.Contrary to popular belief, a conservatory can be placed on any wall, including north facing walls.However, if this is north facing it may make more sense to move it to a sunnier position.An opening on El Castillo's north face leads inside to an ascending staircase.Sheltering the village with is impressive yet formidable presence is the north face of the Eiger.The stairs seem like the north face of the Eiger, the temperature sheer hell.There are other groups of these huts on the north face of Beinn Tart a Mhill.So the total effect was like bedding down for the night on the north face of Kilimanjaro.
faceface2 ●●● S1 W1 verb [transitive]  1 difficult situationDEAL WITH if you face or are faced with a difficult situation, or if a difficult situation faces you, it is going to affect you and you must deal with it Emergency services are facing additional problems this winter. The president faces the difficult task of putting the economy back on its feet. McManus is facing the biggest challenge of his career. As the project comes to an end, many workers now face an uncertain future. He must face the prospect of financial ruin.be faced with something I was faced with the awful job of breaking the news to the girl’s family. the difficulties faced by the police If he is found guilty, he faces up to 12 years in jail.face charges/prosecution (=have legal charges brought against you) He was the first member of the former government to face criminal charges.2 admit a problem existsDEAL WITH (also face up to something) to accept that a difficult situation or problem exists, even though you would prefer to ignore it Many couples refuse to face the fact that there are problems in their marriage. You’ve got to face facts, Rachel. You can’t survive on a salary that low. He had to face the awful truth that she no longer loved him. Face it, kid. You’re never going to be a rock star.3 can’t face4 talk/deal with somebodyDEAL WITH to talk or deal with someone, when this is unpleasant or difficult for you You’re going to have to face him sooner or later. I don’t know how I’m going to face her after what happened. The accident left her feeling depressed and unable to face the world (=be with people and live a normal life).5 be oppositeOPPOSITE/FACE to be opposite someone or something, or to be looking or pointing in a particular direction The two men stood facing each other, smiling. When he turned to face her, he seemed annoyed. Lunch is served on the terrace facing the sea.south-facing/west-facing etc a south-facing gardenface north/east etc The dining room faces east.6 opponent/teamPLAY A GAME OR SPORT to play against an opponent or team in a game or competition Martinez will face Robertson in tomorrow’s final.7 face the music8 be faced with stone/concrete etcCOLLOCATIONSnounsface a problemShe told me about some of the problems she was facing.face a difficultyThe hotel’s owners were facing financial difficulties.face a challengeThe coal industry faces serious challenges.face the task of doing somethingHe faced the task of preparing a three-course meal for 50 people.face a dangerHe has the courage to face danger in spite of fear.face opposition (=deal with strong disagreement)The government faced opposition from the Liberal Democrats.face charges (=be accused of a crime and have to go to a court of law)He faces charges of fraud and theft.face an uncertain/difficult futureThe company is facing an uncertain future.face the prospect of something (=something in the future is going to affect you and you will have to deal with it)Many coastal cities face the prospect of disastrous flooding. face somebody ↔ down face off face up to something→ See Verb table
Examples from the Corpus
faceLatin America faces a growing debt problem.This report highlights some of the problems faced by learners of English.Today's violence highlights the problems faced by the government here.Bedworth, now 19, is facing charges under the Computer Misuse Act, 1990.They served notice that conservative nominees face delay or worse.They stood facing each other for a few minutes.You're going to have to face her sooner or later.Caught in a green translucent wave were two tiny sea-horses facing in opposite directions, one frolicking, the other melancholy.Dean turned to face me.The seat facing mine was empty.UCLA will face North Carolina tonight at Pauley Pavilion.Hughes was the second prominent researcher at Georgetown to face problems because of reproductive research.My house faces the bay.Weber is facing the biggest challenge of his career.McManus knew he was facing the biggest challenge of his career.As at all his power stations, Scott faced the building in a fine Worcestershire brick that has weathered to a lovely pinky-brown.The new administration faces the difficult task of rebuilding the country's economy.The Jets face the Dolphins in two weeks.We had to sit with our backs to the wall, facing the door.Courtney's apartment faces the harbour.The crying continued after that, and continues, but now with other parents who face the same kinds of problems.If found guilty, Jones could face up to 20 years in jail.She stood straight as a wand, facing us.He was faced with the task of breaking the bad news to the boy's relatives.facing ... problemsAs the owners are aging, they are facing considerable problems.But the Church is facing major problems.Sybase is not the only technology company facing problems.They learned by facing real problems and real consequences.Birds can not be conserved by protection in Britain if they are facing greater problems elsewhere.In the United States young hopefuls are facing similar problems in getting flying jobs with the airlines.Between 1974 and 1995, the number of poorer renters facing serious housing problems jumped by two-thirds, to 6 million.As a result, the paper-producing countries of the world are now facing severe problems of ground and water contamination by dioxins.face the fact thatPerhaps he did, but he also had to face the fact that all economic life was a mortal struggle.It was anguishing to face the fact that, all other options tried, reconciliation still did not occur.I felt loads better after the talk even though I had to face the fact that I had been wrong.She had to face the fact that she still missed him.We have to face the fact that there is a bigger risk of nuclear proliferation at present than the world has ever known.He was very soon to be forced to face the fact that things had moved on since 1939.We have to face the fact that we'll be playing teams that are better than we are.Speak out from the pulpit and face the fact that wife beating is sinful.You need to find the courage to face the fact that your fears are unreal.have to faceOnly relatively rarely would one community of humans have to face and deal with another.Now he would have to face Gina's displeasure.He'd have to face Helen sooner or later, so better sooner.Of course, Clinton may not have to face his Generation X constituents again, but members of Congress will.In the end, he would have to face Hooker with fewer men than he had employed against Burnside.One day you're going to have to face it, either by telling me, or telling some one.Such theories have to face the obvious objection that brain processes and mental phenomena seem utterly unalike.He pushed open the screen hardly expecting to have to face the old man alone.turned to faceClimbing from the fence, she turned to face him.It can not move and shoot in the same turn, except that it can be turned to face its intended target.Lee turned to face Philip and Philip knew immediately what was going to happen.I entered and with equal impassivity turned to face the corridor.We had our backs to them because we had turned to face the direction where the enemy was firing at us from.Willie turned to face the fire, his head bowed over the range.Finally, Converse turned to face them.They turned to face us, and the sight of them did nothing for our confidence.
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Verb table
face
Simple Form
Present
I, you, we, theyface
he, she, itfaces
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Past
I, you, he, she, it, we, theyfaced
Present perfect
I, you, we, theyhave faced
he, she, ithas faced
Past perfect
I, you, he, she, it, we, theyhad faced
Future
I, you, he, she, it, we, theywill face
Future perfect
I, you, he, she, it, we, theywill have faced
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Continuous Form
Present
Iam facing
he, she, itis facing
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you, we, theyare facing
Past
I, he, she, itwas facing
you, we, theywere facing
Present perfect
I, you, we, theyhave been facing
he, she, ithas been facing
Past perfect
I, you, he, she, it, we, theyhad been facing
Future
I, you, he, she, it, we, theywill be facing
Future perfect
I, you, he, she, it, we, theywill have been facing
> View Less