Longman Dictionary of Contemporary English homepage

Date: 1300-1400
Language: French
Origin: fader, from Latin fatuus; FATUOUS

fade

verb
     
fade
1 also fade away [intransitive] to gradually disappear:
Hopes of a peace settlement are beginning to fade.
Over the years her beauty had faded a little.
2 [intransitive and transitive] to lose colour and brightness, or to make something do this:
the fading evening light
a pair of faded jeans
The sun had faded the curtains.
3 also fade away [intransitive] to become weaker physically, especially so that you become very ill or die
4 [intransitive] if a team fades, it stops playing as well as it did before

fade in

phrasal verb
AM to appear slowly or become louder, or to make a picture or sound do this
fade something ↔ in
Additional background sound is faded in at the beginning of the shot.
fade-in noun [countable]

fade out

phrasal verb
to disappear slowly or become quieter, or to make a picture or sound do this
fade something ↔ out
He slid a control to fade out the music.
fade-out noun [countable]

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