Longman Dictionary of Contemporary English homepage

Language: Old English
Origin: forgietan

forget

verb
     
for‧get S1 W1 past tense forgot, past participle forgotten
1

facts/information

[intransitive and transitive] to not remember facts, information, or people or things from the past:
I'm sorry, I've forgotten your name.
I know you told me, but I forgot.
What happened that day will never be forgotten.
forget about
Karl says he forgot about our date.
She forgot all about their anniversary.
forget (that)
I forgot that there's a speed limit here.
forget how/what/when/why etc
How can you forget where you've parked the car?
He's someone who never forgets a face (=forgets who someone is).
I was forgetting ... (=said when you have just remembered or been reminded about something) spoken:
Oh yes, I was forgetting she was pregnant.
2

something you must do

[intransitive and transitive] to not remember to do something that you should do:
'Did you remember to post that letter?' 'Oh, sorry, I forgot.'
Give me your phone number before I forget (=forget to get it).
forget to do something
Someone's forgotten to turn off their headlights.
clean forget American English (=completely forget)
He meant to invite Monica, but he clean forgot.
3

leave something somewhere

[transitive] to not remember to bring something that you need with you
forget your keys/money/cigarettes etc
Oh no, I've forgotten my wallet.
4

stop thinking about

[intransitive and transitive] to stop thinking or worrying about someone or something:
Forget him, he's not worth it.
At my age, I think I can forget fashion.
forget (that)
After a while you'll forget you're wearing contact lenses.
forget about
I'll never be able to forget about the accident.
5

not care about

[intransitive and transitive] to not care about or give attention to someone or something any longer
forget about
Don't forget about your old friends when you go off to college, okay?
You can't afford to forget your relationship with your husband.
6

stop a plan

[intransitive and transitive] to stop planning to do something because it is no longer possible or sensible
forget about
We'll have to forget about going on holiday.
If we can't get any funding we might as well forget the whole thing.
7

not forgetting something

British English used to add something to a list of things you have mentioned:
You'll have to pay for the packaging and transportation costs, not forgetting airport taxes.
8

forget yourself

a) to do something stupid or embarrassing, especially by losing control of your emotions:
Lisa forgot herself and reached out to touch his knee.
b) British English to become so involved in something that you do not think about or notice anything else [= lose yourself]
forget yourself in something
Often he would forget himself in his work for hours.
9 spoken

don't forget

a) used to remind someone to do something:
We need bread, milk, and eggs - don't forget.
don't forget to do something
Don't forget to lock up when you leave.
b) used to remind someone about an important fact or detail that they should consider
don't forget (that)
But don't forget that you have to pay interest on the loan.
Don't forget, I'll be home late tonight..
c) used to remind someone to take something with them:
Don't forget your sandwiches.
10 spoken

forget it

spoken
a) used to tell someone that something is not important and they do not need to worry about it:
'Sorry I didn't phone.' 'Forget it.'
b) used to tell someone to stop asking or talking about something, because it is annoying you:
I'm not coming with you, so forget it.
c) also forget that! American English used to tell someone that you refuse to do something or that it will be impossible to do something:
'Can you lend me $10.' 'Forget it, no way.'
If you're thinking of getting Roy to help, you can forget it!
d) used when someone asks you what you just said and you do not want to repeat it:
'What did you say?' ' Nothing, just forget it.'
11 spoken

I'll never forget something

used to say that you will always remember something from the past, because it was sad, funny, enjoyable etc:
I'll never forget the look on his face when he opened the door.
12 spoken

aren't you forgetting...?/haven't you forgotten...?

used to remind someone about something, often humorously:
Aren't you forgetting that you're already married?
13 spoken

I forget

used to say that you cannot remember a particular detail about something
I forget what/where/how etc
I forget what he said exactly but it was very rude.
I forget the name/details etc
I forget the name of the street, but it's the first on the left.
14 spoken

and don't you forget it

used to remind someone angrily about an important fact that should make them behave differently:
I'm the boss around here, and don't you forget it!

Dictionary pictures of the day
Do you know what each of these is called?
What is the word for picture 1? What is the word for picture 2? What is the word for picture 3? What is the word for picture 4?
Click on any of the pictures above to find out what it is called.

Explore our topic dictionary