English version

fraud

From Longman Dictionary of Contemporary English
Related topics: Crime
fraudfraud /frɔːd $ frɒːd/ ●●○ noun  1 [countable, uncountable]SCCB the crime of deceiving people in order to gain something such as money or goodstax/insurance/credit card etc fraud He’s been charged with tax fraud. electoral fraud She was found guilty of fraud.see thesaurus at crime2 [countable]CHEAT someone or something that is not what they claim to be I felt like a fraud. The police exposed the letter as a fraud.
Examples from the Corpus
fraudIt was weeks before they realized that the young man who had charmed them all was a fraud.Landale is calling for more laws to protect consumers against fraud.Big losses due to theft and fraud forced the company to close.In each case the owner of the goods was induced by fraud to part with them to the rogue.He would ultimately get indicted for fraud as a result.The market and the opportunities for fraud keep growing.The vote fraud charges had aroused people.Clearly, however, that does not mean that the City is riddled with fraud or that the regulatory system has failed.tax/insurance/credit card etc fraudRead in studio A firm has come up with a new high-tech way to beat credit card fraud.Meanwhile credit card fraud rose by 40 %.Half were victims of credit card fraud while 41 percent were targets for shoplifters.
From Longman Business Dictionaryfraudfraud /frɔːdfrɒːd/ noun [countable, uncountable] LAWa method of illegally getting money from a person or organization, often using clever and complicated methodsShould audits be expected to detect every fraud?He had a criminal conviction for credit card fraud.Hood was convicted of tax fraud and sent to prison.
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