English version

frivolous

From Longman Dictionary of Contemporary Englishfrivolousfriv‧o‧lous /ˈfrɪvələs/ adjective  1 JOKING/NOT SERIOUSnot serious or sensible, especially in a way that is not suitable for a particular occasion The court discourages frivolous lawsuits.2 JOKING/NOT SERIOUSa frivolous person likes having fun rather than doing serious or sensible things – used to show disapproval opp seriousfrivolously adverb
Examples from the Corpus
frivolousOur stuff may be any combination of old and new, used or unused, practical, sentimental or frivolous.Perhaps the characters are arbitrary and the ancestral female's choice was frivolous.To be thinking about partying was downright frivolous!Would some parents choose schools with the fanciest athletic facilities or the most frivolous courses and waste taxpayers' money?Work time is too valuable to waste on frivolous games.It could hardly be said that Mrs. Bush had led a frivolous or unproductive life.She seemed to have a proper regard for the frivolous things in life.But amassing wealth did not turn Maria into a frivolous woman; she started the family vocation of caregiving.
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