English version

full-blown

From Longman Dictionary of Contemporary Englishfull-blownˈfull-blown adjective [only before noun] 🔊 🔊 COMPLETEhaving all the qualities of something that is at its most complete or advanced stage 🔊 The drop in shares could develop into a full-blown crisis. 🔊 full-blown AIDS
Examples from the Corpus
full-blown• As in any full-blown controversy, these polarised positions were the ones taken up by most contributors to the fight.• But doctors predicted that her chance of developing full-blown diabetes in the next five years was at least 1 in 4.• What began as a serious oil spill has become a full-blown environmental disaster.• Others again, such as physics, chemistry or history, have important professional associations or societies without being full-blown professions.• Now, however, they are being formally recognised as mild, but genuine, variations of full-blown psychosis.
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