English version

get on

From Longman Dictionary of Contemporary Englishget on phrasal verb1 like somebody especially British EnglishRELATIONSHIP if people get on, they like each other and have a friendly relationship with each other with I’ve always got on well with Henry. The two boys get on well most of the time.2 progressPROGRESS to deal with a job or situation or to make progress How is George getting on at school? with How are you getting on with your essay? without I don’t know how we’ll get on without Michael.3 continue doing somethingCONTINUE/START AGAIN to continue doing something with Be quiet and get on with your work!4 be successful to be successful in your job You’ll have to work hard if you want to get on.5 clothing get something on to put a piece of clothing on I can’t get my boots on!6 be getting on a) LATEif time is getting on, it is quite late Come on, it’s getting on and we ought to go home. I realized that time was getting on and we would have to hurry. b) informalOLD/NOT YOUNG if someone is getting on, they are quite old7 getting on for 90/10 o’clock/2,000 etcTIME/AT A PARTICULAR TIME almost a particular age, time, number etc Mrs McIntyre must be getting on for 90 by now. The total cost was getting on for $100,000.8 get it on American English informalSEX/HAVE SEX WITH to have sex9 get on with it! spokenHURRY used to tell someone to hurry Will you lot stop messing around and get on with it!10 let somebody get on with it informal to let someone do something on their own, and not help them or tell them what to do She wanted to decorate her room, so I just let her get on with it. get→ See Verb table
Examples from the Corpus
get onGet on a number 73 bus at the corner. That will take you to Islington High Street.She's old and needs help getting on and off the bus.The train stopped in the middle of the night in Nogales. No one got on or off.We got on the train at Lime Street station.get withI am sure that I would have got on with both men, famously well.But the seizures spread to affect the other side of the brain as well, preventing it from getting on with development.Get on with it! We don't have all day.You just get on with it.Stop messing around - just get on with it!I need to get on with my homework.I'm glad the guests are gone so I can get on with my work.Why, therefore, did congress not get on with the business of removing a patently guilty president?Could we get on with the class, please?Contestant, Fiona, says she's just eager to get on with the game as soon as possible.Heavy rain is preventing rescue teams from getting on with the search.They saw themselves as wanting to get on with the teaching of their subject.Get on with your work, please. There's a lot to do.get withI am sure that I would have got on with both men, famously well.But the seizures spread to affect the other side of the brain as well, preventing it from getting on with development.You just get on with it.Why, therefore, did congress not get on with the business of removing a patently guilty president?Could we get on with the class, please?Contestant, Fiona, says she's just eager to get on with the game as soon as possible.They saw themselves as wanting to get on with the teaching of their subject.get withI am sure that I would have got on with both men, famously well.But the seizures spread to affect the other side of the brain as well, preventing it from getting on with development.You just get on with it.Why, therefore, did congress not get on with the business of removing a patently guilty president?Could we get on with the class, please?Contestant, Fiona, says she's just eager to get on with the game as soon as possible.They saw themselves as wanting to get on with the teaching of their subject.be getting onEthel's getting on in years now -- she must be in her late 60s.That evening her son returned and came to see how she was getting on.Cal is getting on a bit and doesn't play much golf anymore.She knew it was a stupid thing to say, but the presence of Magrat was getting on her nerves.You may not want to risk breeding from such a mare, especially if she is getting on in years.It was getting on midnight now, and cold.This child was getting on my nerves.After numerous attempts I was getting on quite well, managing to get right up on to the bike.He wondered how she was getting on, she and Violet, and if she was happy in Mitford.And you must be getting on with your exciting adventures.get it onDo you think those two are ever going to get it on?Only he's actually got it on a scooter.The point was to get it on, and never mind the fusses and frills.Be careful, though, not to get it on eyelashes.Shoot, get it on, get it over with.Now have you got it on the thing or have you got it on the bottom of the frame?Should he continue getting it on, then go for her.You get it on your hands.
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Verb table
get
Simple Form
Present
I, you, we, theyget
he, she, itgets
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Past
I, you, he, she, it, we, theygot
Present perfect
I, you, we, theyhave got
he, she, ithas got
Past perfect
I, you, he, she, it, we, theyhad got
Future
I, you, he, she, it, we, theywill get
Future perfect
I, you, he, she, it, we, theywill have got
> View Less
Continuous Form
Present
Iam getting
he, she, itis getting
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you, we, theyare getting
Past
I, he, she, itwas getting
you, we, theywere getting
Present perfect
I, you, we, theyhave been getting
he, she, ithas been getting
Past perfect
I, you, he, she, it, we, theyhad been getting
Future
I, you, he, she, it, we, theywill be getting
Future perfect
I, you, he, she, it, we, theywill have been getting
> View Less