English version

go

From Longman Dictionary of Contemporary Englishgogo1 /ɡəʊ $ ɡoʊ/ ●●● S1 W1 verb (past tense went /went/, past participle gone /ɡɒn $ ɡɒːn/, third person singular goes /ɡəʊz $ ɡoʊz/)  1 move/travel a) [intransitive always + adverb/preposition] (also been) to travel or move to a place that is away from where you are or where you livecome There’s nothing more we can do here. Let’s go home. Have you ever been to (=have you ever travelled to) Japan? I have been to (=have travelled to) Germany several times. Where are you going? We’re going to Canada in the summer. Dinah went into the kitchen. She went over and put her arm around him. I’m going round to her house to find out what’s wrong. I’ll just go up (=go upstairs) and ask him what he wants. b) [intransitive, transitive] to move or travel in a particular way or for a particular distance It took us over an hour to go ten miles. The car was going much too fast. We went a different way from usual that day.go by bus/train/car etc It’ll be quicker to go by train. c) go and do something (also go do something American English) [not in past tenses] to move to a particular place in order to do something Go wash your hands. I went and spoke to the manager.see thesaurus at travel2 go flying/laughing/rushing etc3 attend a) [intransitive] to be at a concert, party, meeting etcgo to Are you going to Manuela’s party? I first went to a rock concert when I was 15. b) go to school/church/work etc to regularly attend school, a church etc He doesn’t go to the synagogue these days.4 leave [intransitive]LEAVE A PLACE to leave a place What time does the last train go? Right, let’s go! She turned to go.be/get going It’s late! I must get going.5 do a particular activity [intransitive, transitive] to leave the place where you are, in order to do somethinggo for a walk/swim etc Let’s go for a walk.go shopping/swimming/skiing etc I need to go shopping this afternoon.go on a trip/tour/cruise etc My parents are going on a cruise.6 be going to do something7 change [linking verb]BECOME to change in some way, especially by becoming worse than before The company went bankrupt last year.go bad/sour etc The bread’s gone mouldy.go grey/white etc Her hair is starting to go grey.go mad/deaf/bald etc He went crazy and tried to kill her.go wild/mad/white etc with something The crowd was going wild with excitement.see thesaurus at becomeGRAMMAR: Linking verbsGo is used as a linking verb in this meaning. It links the subject of the sentence with an adjective: The sky went very dark.I felt my face go red.8 happen [intransitive always + adverb/preposition]HAPPEN to happen or develop in a particular way How did your French test go?go well/smoothly/fine etc The party went well. Everything’s going fine at the moment. I feel very encouraged by the way things are going. Many industries have been forced to cut jobs and it looks like the electronics industry is going the same way.9 how are things going?/how’s it going?/how goes it?10 reach [intransitive always + adverb/preposition]REACH to reach as far as a particular place or to lead to a particular place The road goes through the middle of the forest. The belt won’t go around my waist.11 usual position [intransitive always + adverb/preposition, not in progressive]PLACE if something goes somewhere, that is its usual position Where do the plates go? The book goes on the top shelf.12 fit [intransitive]FIT/BE THE RIGHT SIZE to be the right size, shape, or amount for a particular spacego in/under/inside etc I don’t think all that will go in the suitcase.13 be sent [intransitive]SEND to be sent or passed ongo by/through/to etc The email went to everyone in the company. That letter should go by special delivery. Complaints must go through the proper channels.14 be in a particular state/condition [linking verb]BE to be in a particular state or condition, especially a bad one Many families are forced to go hungry.15 go unanswered/unnoticed/unrewarded etc16 start [intransitive]START DOING something to start doing something The preparations have been completed and we’re ready to go. Generally the action doesn’t get going (=start) until after midnight. I’m going to get going on (=start doing) the decorating next week.17 work well [intransitive]WORKING/NOT BROKEN if a clock, watch, or machine goes, it moves and works as it should do My watch isn’t going. I couldn’t get the pump going (=make it work).18 make movement [intransitive always + adverb/preposition]MOVE something OR somebody used when you are telling someone about what movement someone or something made She went like this with her hand.19 say [transitive] spoken informalSAY/STATE to say something I asked her what she meant and she just went, ‘Don’t ask!’20 make a sound [transitive] to make a particular sound The balloon suddenly went bang.21 don’t go doing something22 have gone and done something23 to go24 don’t go there25 story/discussion/song etc [intransitive always + adverb/preposition, transitive]XX used to talk about what something such as a story or song consists of The argument goes like this. We need to ‘spread a little happiness’, as the song goes. The story goes that my grandfather saved his captain’s life in battle.GrammarIn this meaning, go is not used in the progressive. You say: I don’t know how the song goes. Don’t say: I don’t know how the song is going. 26 whistle/bell etc [intransitive]WARN to make a noise as a warning or signal A bell goes to mark the end of each class.27 here/there somebody goes again28 disappear [intransitive]DISAPPEAR to no longer exist or no longer be in the same place syn disappear Has your headache gone yet? The door was open and all his things had gone.29 get into worse condition [intransitive]WORSE if one of your senses such as sight, hearing etc is going, it is getting worse Dad’s eyesight is starting to go. I’d forgotten that. My mind must be going.30 to be obeyed [intransitive] if what someone says goes, that person is in authority and what they say should be obeyed Phil’s in charge, and what he says goes.31 be damaged [intransitive]DAMAGE to become weak, damaged etc, or stop working properly The bulb’s gone in the bathroom. My jeans are starting to go at the knee.32 die [intransitive]DIE to die – use this when you want to avoid saying the word ‘die’ Now that his wife’s gone, he’s all on his own. When I go, I’d like to have my ashes scattered at sea. dead and gone at dead133 be spent [intransitive]SPEND MONEY to be spent I don’t know where all my money goes!go on Half her salary goes on the rent.34 be sold [intransitive]SELL to be soldgo for/at A house like this would go for £250,000.go to The jewels will go to the highest bidder. He bought me some CDs which were going cheap (=were being sold at a low price).35 pay money [intransitive] to offer a particular amount of money for something I’ll give you $500 for it but I can’t go any higher than that.go to I think we could probably go to £15,000.36 going, going, gone!37 time [intransitive always + adverb/preposition]PASS/GO PAST used to say how quickly or slowly time passes The day seemed to go so slowly.38 there/bang goes something39 go to show/prove/indicate etc something40 be going41 colours/styles/tastes [intransitive] if colours, tastes, styles etc go, they look, taste etc good together I don’t think pink and yellow really go.go with Do you think this shirt will go with the skirt I bought?go together Pork and apple go especially well together.42 as somebody/something goes43 go all out44 have nothing/not much/a lot etc going for somebody/something45 where does somebody/something go from here?46 going forward47 leave a job [intransitive] to leave your job, especially because you are forced to He was becoming an embarrassment to the government and had to go. If Jill goes, who will take her place?48 get rid of something [intransitive] if something goes, someone gets rid of it The policies will have to go if the party is to win the next election. A hundred jobs are expected to go following the merger.49 toilet [intransitive] informal to make waste come out of your body go about go after something/somebody go against somebody/something go ahead go along go along with somebody/something go around go at something/somebody go away go back go back on something go back to something go before go beyond something go by go down go down on somebody go down with something go for somebody/something go forward go in go in for something go in with somebody go into something go off go off on somebody go off with something/somebody go on go out go over go over to something go round go through go through with something go to somebody/something go together go towards something go under go up go with somebody/something go without→ See Verb table
Examples from the Corpus
goI've packed all my bags, and I'm ready to go.I can't get the lawnmower to go.I don't exactly remember how the song goes.I dropped my watch, but it's still going.Come on, Joe, it's time to go.Do you know what time the next bus goes?Do you think this goes?Her face went bright red with embarrassment.Don't go just yet - it's not that late!How many of you actually went last week?"How are your exams going, Luke?" "Fine, thanks."Cats go "meow."Fiona says that her new teaching job is going really well.As soon as the band started playing, the crowd went silent.I'll have to go soon - was there anything else you wanted to talk about?How's the job going these days?Did you go to the baseball game last weekend?How far have we gone today?Did the party go well?be/get goingIt's late - I should be going.Fundamental arguments will be found to support a boom if one gets going.Stillman never seemed to be going anywhere in particular, nor did he seem to know where he was.I still felt grumpy, but as the preacher got going I also discovered that somehow I wanted him to do well.Incidentally, he seemed to be going long in avocados.She is very brave, which is plenty to be going on with.If you are known to be seeing a shrink you are deemed to be going round the bend.So whichever you happen to be going to.go for a walk/swim etcI decided to go for a walk.I thanked him, went for a walk by myself and sobbed.So if you go for a walk in the desert in a few years time and a plane flies overhead, hide.I laced up the Docs and went for a walk in the hills behind Gallanach.I go for walks, sometimes, when I have time.Constance and Will loved going for walks together.Tonight when supper was over she said she wanted him to go for a walk with her.go bad/sour etcIn 1993, a wage garnishment was filed against him stemming from a diamond sale gone sour.There is a difference between a project which never gets off the ground and one which suddenly goes bad.Why then do inspectors go bad?The deal went sour and Coles lost A $ 18 million.The whole place is always going bad, marching relentlessly towards the sell-by date.The taste of manna has gone sour on them.Too often relationships go sour or become impoverished through lack of attention.What items would go bad quickly and should be eaten first?go well/smoothly/fine etcAll seemed to be going well.At a full council meeting in Darlington members heard the appeal is going well.That is a hope that goes well beyond the findings of the sciences at the present time.But complaints go well beyond the present campaign.He was given an ultimatum by Murphy to prove his fitness by Friday but went well in training on Monday.At the same time I think some people are going well over the top in slagging off Wilko.When things go well, pat yourself on the back and tell at least one other person.If the group review process goes well, the next step may include some experimentation, market research, or prototype development.go in/under/inside etcThe first crop of experienced lawmakers was eliminated in November and a second crop will go in 2002.Because it was attached to the straw and the string, it went in a straight line.All 2,060 workers will go in a town which is already an unemployment blackspot.When I went in, everyone laughed.Lilya would go in her car, and I would go in mine.When the imitation worked and the ball went in, I could barely contain myself.Few people went in or out to gossip with her.If the problem is one of bedwetting then the chart should go in the child's bedroom.go by/through/to etcBut the other night they went to a carnival at Amphi and each won some goldfish.The younger boys go to bed at nine o'clock.But they can not walk from reserve to reserve without going through cities.Anyway, we went out to dinner and then went to a speakeasy.His place at No. 3 goes to Gary Harrington.What is he going to put in new bathrooms for?One thousand cars went to the cemetery.Jasper and I went to the limousine, and Jasper asked the better-looking bartender for two glasses of red wine.go hungryWithout welfare benefits, many may become homeless, others will go hungry.Frankie had learned to prepare in advance for those days and nights when he might otherwise go hungry.Most of the 300,000 people live off the land and no one has gone hungry.No-one is allowed to go hungry.It was a compulsion I'd starved for, and even if I never went hungry again I would feel that compulsion for ever.Thousands of families go hungry every day.Many people had lost everything they owned in the floods and many were now going hungry, he said.Families went hungry, lost nine months of income, and for what, really?She has never gone hungry, suffered horrible illness or seen some one she loves die.The mother bird will often go hungry to keep her babies alive.get goingThe impish Forrester scribbles pedagogic remarks all over Jamal's unformed jottings and a sparky, mutually nurturing relationship gets going.Then Tam would come out and we could get going.We've got so much to do - let's get going.Could a form of cumulative selection get going?I know I need to get up and get going.The coach was supposed to leave at 10:30 but we eventually got going at 3 o'clock.Everyone wanted to get going but no one was confident about how.Let's get going now or we'll miss the train.Races could only get going on a majority vote of the Student Union, and then only if it was quorate.They were sharp and deadly and able to cut off anything that the Sparks tried to get going on offense.You need to get going on that report. It's due tomorrow.Once he gets going, there is no stopping this longtime Chicago talk-show host, sports commentator, actor, professional raconteur.Get going, you two! Didn't you hear the school bell?get ... goingFundamental arguments will be found to support a boom if one gets going.I know I need to get up and get going.It kind of got us going.Magnus could have made one of his rude jokes which would really have got Claire going.Dave gets the conversation going again, explaining how courting and nailing down a prospect take some time.Then my son-in-law managed to get her heart going again.He actually got the adrenalin going, forced the pendulum which had almost stopped to swing again.Things were just getting going when a neighbour appeared.go onOccasionally he would stop writing, read through what he had written, and then go on.It has to do with not knowing what is going on.Marlon: What's going on?Their remit is not to charge or discipline officers, but to uncover exactly what has gone on.I wish you'd stop going on about how expensive everything is.Mick went to have his hair cut just to stop his wife going on about it.I wish you'd stop going on about work all the time.He went on and on until we were all half asleep.Mum was always going on at me to do something with my musical talent, but I was more interested in sport.Look, I'll do the dishes when I've finished writing this letter. Just stop going on at me!As part of the class, they go on company tours and job shadows organized by the business partners.Go on, have another piece.He went on in a soft voice, "I love you, Jane."They were sharp and deadly and able to cut off anything that the Sparks tried to get going on offense.If student reports are anything to go on, the system does appear to work at Thayer.He went on to say that there would be times when she would be expected to attend evening or weekend meetings.Once everyone was quiet, Michael went on with his story.If you'd been with me, I might have stiffened myself and gone on with it.Let's stop now. We'll go on with this tomorrow.After a short break for coffee, they went on working until 3 o'clock.go for/atIt is best to go for fabrics which are stretch- and fade-resistant as well as stain- and mildew-resistant.There are obvious benefits in allowing each student to go at his own pace.Your educated boys went at it a little more privately and gracefully, but sometimes destroyed more people in the long run.A year of unprecedented success for a band that has been gone for more than a quarter-century.So, the two golden rules when buying are to go for quality and buy the largest you can afford.I go for walks, sometimes, when I have time.go withI think everybody just goes with a certain flow.It's best to go with an organised group if you want to cycle or paddle your way through the area.Years ago he persuaded me to go with him up to Tigouga, his home village, and the near-mystical Tichka Plateau above.Emerson talks about listening to that inner voice and going with it, all voices to the contrary."What do you think of Jo's idea?" "I think we should go with it - I can't think of anything better."We considered all the options and decided to go with John's original proposal.In the end the Chairman of Governors went with me.I love that pale blue wallpaper, but I don't think it would go with the carpet.It was agreed that I would go with them under the aegis of Bhopal ji who immediately understood photographic requirements.When they're excluded, a great many calories will go with them!If you want an on-line service, go with them.That jacket will go really well with your blue skirt.I'm not sure that those earrings will go with your dress.
gogo2 ●●● S1 noun (plural goes)  1 try [countable]TRY TO DO OR GET something an attempt to do something ‘I can’t open this drawer.’ ‘Here, let me have a go.’ On the tour, everyone can have a go at making a pot. I’d thought about it for some time and decided to give it a go (=try to do something). I had a good go (=tried hard) at cleaning the silver.at/in one go Ruby blew out all her candles at one go. I’m not sure it will work but it’s worth a go.2 your turn [countable]PLAY A GAME OR SPORT someone’s turn in a game or someone’s turn to use something Whose go is it? It’s your go. Can I have a go on your guitar? Don’t I get a go?3 make a go of something4 £3/$50 etc a go5 on the go6 something is a go7 something is (a) no go8 it’s all go9 have a go10 energy [uncountable] British EnglishENERGETIC energy and a desire to do things There’s plenty of go in him yet.11 all the go
Examples from the Corpus
goIn the end I had to have a go!You told me you're good at most sports, so you'd better just try and give it a go.The rest of the story is that my great-grandfather could never really make a go of his life after that.have a goSo stay with me and have a go.I'm not sure I'll be able to persuade him, but I'll certainly have a go.Mrs James will certainly have gone home, but Gerard will still be up until after the last guest has gone.The finish could have gone either way.He says that when burning oak powder it's possible that a spark could have gone astray.Presidential families have gone to great lengths before to preserve the privacy of their personal correspondence.I'll have a go at repairing the roof myself.David kept saying she should simply not have gone up there ... but how could she not have gone, being Harriet?Since then, scientists have gone back to the lab and improved it.Maybe he should have gone to work for a firm.have a go onMeanwhile tens of thousands of Marvs have gone on sale since June.Students have gone on strike and then failed to make up the days lost.He was the kind of man Nigel would have liked to have gone on the pick-up with.Her knees seemed to have gone on strike.The good life might well have gone on indefinitely.Out of that initial group, five women have gone on to obtain college degrees, McKenzie said.The Sergeant was a very good piper and would have gone on all night.
From Longman Business Dictionarygogo /gəʊgoʊ/ verb (past tense went /went/, past participle gone /gɒngɒːn/) [intransitive]1to be sold for a particular amount or to a particular persongo for somethingHe believes GM shares will fetch $45 by the year-end, while Ford will go for 40.go to somebodyGovernment spending in the area doubled, but most of it went to the oil industry.2COMMERCE go it alone to do something on your own, for example to start a new businessUnless an entrepreneur wants to go it alone and has the necessary money and talents, he or she may have to take on a partner.3used before an adjective or adjectival phrase to mean that something has happened or been done in a particular way. For example, if someone goes BANKRUPT, they become bankrupt; if a company goes GLOBAL, it starts doing business all over the world go after go back on something go down go under go with something→ See Verb table
Pictures of the day
Do you know what each of these is called?
Click on the pictures to check.
Verb table
go
Simple Form
Present
I, you, we, theygo
he, she, itgoes
> View More
Past
I, you, he, she, it, we, theywent
Present perfect
I, you, we, theyhave gone
he, she, ithas gone
Past perfect
I, you, he, she, it, we, theyhad gone
Future
I, you, he, she, it, we, theywill go
Future perfect
I, you, he, she, it, we, theywill have gone
> View Less
Continuous Form
Present
Iam going
he, she, itis going
> View More
you, we, theyare going
Past
I, he, she, itwas going
you, we, theywere going
Present perfect
I, you, we, theyhave been going
he, she, ithas been going
Past perfect
I, you, he, she, it, we, theyhad been going
Future
I, you, he, she, it, we, theywill be going
Future perfect
I, you, he, she, it, we, theywill have been going
> View Less