English version

go ahead

From Longman Dictionary of Contemporary Englishgo aheadgo aheada) spokenYES used to tell someone they can do something πŸ”Š β€˜Can I have the sports section?’ β€˜Yeah, go ahead, I’ve read it.’ b) START DOING somethingto do something that was planned, especially in spite of a problemgo ahead with πŸ”Š Frank’ll be late but we’ll go ahead with the meeting anyway. c) to take place πŸ”Š Tests of anti-cancer drugs are to go ahead this year. β†’ go-ahead1 β†’ ahead
Examples from the Corpus
ahead withβ€’ If no firm offer has been made within three months the farmer is free to go ahead with his original plans.β€’ For the moment, however, I feel it would be better if he was dissuaded from going ahead with it.β€’ But in practice, if most countries want to go ahead with something, they may well ignore a lone dissenter.β€’ Frank will be late but we'll go ahead with the meeting anyway.β€’ The Ministry of Defence is to go ahead with the partial privatisation of its defence research laboratories.β€’ The manager had agreed to let him go ahead with the remodeling.β€’ The meeting made it crystal clear that Carter was determined to go ahead with the withdrawal.β€’ Be assured that if you go ahead with your plans you will meet with certain defeat.
go ahead phrasal verb1 START DOING somethingto start to do something, especially after planning it or asking permission to do it with πŸ”Š They’ve decided to go ahead with plans to build 50 new houses on the site.go ahead and do something πŸ”Š I went ahead and arranged the trip anyway.2 HAPPENif an event or process goes ahead, it happens πŸ”Š A judge has ruled that the music festival can go ahead.3 spoken used to give someone permission to do something, or let them speak before you πŸ”Š β€˜Do you mind if I open the window?’ β€˜No, go ahead.’ πŸ”Š If you want to leave, go right ahead.4 (also go on ahead)BEFORE to go somewhere before the other people in your group πŸ”Š You go ahead and we’ll catch you up later. of πŸ”Š He stood back to let Sue go ahead of him.5 to start to be winning a game or competition πŸ”Š Dulwich went ahead after 22 minutes. β†’ go-ahead1 β†’ goβ†’ See Verb table
Examples from the Corpus
go aheadβ€’ If you want to buy a flamboyant pair of trousers, go ahead!β€’ Sure, go ahead and buy a used car from Slipshod Acme car company.β€’ I dared him to go ahead and do it.β€’ Look, so little is known about her, just go ahead and get all the research done now.β€’ If you decide not to go ahead, just return the Policy within 15 days.go withβ€’ If no firm offer has been made within three months the farmer is free to go ahead with his original plans.β€’ For the moment, however, I feel it would be better if he was dissuaded from going ahead with it.β€’ But in practice, if most countries want to go ahead with something, they may well ignore a lone dissenter.β€’ The Ministry of Defence is to go ahead with the partial privatisation of its defence research laboratories.β€’ The manager had agreed to let him go ahead with the remodeling.β€’ The meeting made it crystal clear that Carter was determined to go ahead with the withdrawal.β€’ Be assured that if you go ahead with your plans you will meet with certain defeat.go right aheadβ€’ "Do you mind if I smoke?" "No, go right ahead."β€’ And I said, no, go right ahead.β€’ As he put the phone down he thought: You go right ahead.β€’ EmmyD: Sure, go right ahead.β€’ If it sounds good, go right ahead.β€’ If you want to try it out yourself, go right ahead.β€’ If there are any changes you wish to make concerning a relative, go right ahead and make them.go ofβ€’ Humphrey, who had been closing steadily on Nixon, went ahead of him in the polls.β€’ As a young man, with the priesthood still a distant dream, Hughes had gone ahead of his people.
go-aheadˈgo-ahead1 noun πŸ”Š πŸ”Š β†’ give (somebody) the go-ahead/get the go-ahead
Examples from the Corpus
go-aheadβ€’ Carter also gave a go-ahead for a military attempt to rescue the hostages.β€’ The project was given a formal go-ahead by the Railtrack Board in January following several years of planning and discussions over financing.β€’ No official go-ahead from the national safety authorities has yet been given.β€’ There are still a number of potential stumbling blocks beginning with today's meeting before the project could get the go-ahead.β€’ All we need now is the go-ahead from Southampton Council.β€’ A 1995 reform measure gave Jones the go-ahead to compile a single state voter list.β€’ Geffin gave Metheny the go-ahead without blinking an eye.β€’ At this point management gives you the go-ahead on the project and you start work.
go-aheadgo-ahead2 adjective [only before noun] British English πŸ”Š πŸ”Š MODERNusing new methods or ideas and therefore likely to succeed πŸ”Š a go-ahead company
Examples from the Corpus
go-aheadβ€’ Against Oregon five days later, he made the go-ahead basket, grabbed a rebound and sparked his lethargic teammates.β€’ Fortuna is a young, go-ahead computer company based in DΓΌsseldorf.β€’ Sunday's dynamic, no-nonsense, no-holds barred mood makes it a go-ahead time.
Pictures of the day
Do you know what each of these is called?
Click on the pictures to check.
Verb table
go
Simple Form
Present
I, you, we, theygo
he, she, itgoes
> View More
Past
I, you, he, she, it, we, theywent
Present perfect
I, you, we, theyhave gone
he, she, ithas gone
Past perfect
I, you, he, she, it, we, theyhad gone
Future
I, you, he, she, it, we, theywill go
Future perfect
I, you, he, she, it, we, theywill have gone
> View Less
Continuous Form
Present
Iam going
he, she, itis going
> View More
you, we, theyare going
Past
I, he, she, itwas going
you, we, theywere going
Present perfect
I, you, we, theyhave been going
he, she, ithas been going
Past perfect
I, you, he, she, it, we, theyhad been going
Future
I, you, he, she, it, we, theywill be going
Future perfect
I, you, he, she, it, we, theywill have been going
> View Less