English version

gossip

From Longman Dictionary of Contemporary Englishgossipgos‧sip1 /ˈɡɒsɪp $ ˈɡɑː-/ ●●○ noun 🔊 🔊 1 [uncountable]RUMOUR/RUMOR information that is passed from one person to another about other people’s behaviour and private lives, often including unkind or untrue remarksgossip about 🔊 Here’s an interesting piece of gossip about Mrs Smith. 🔊 What’s the latest gossip? 🔊 Do you want to hear some juicy gossip? 🔊 She had no time for idle gossip. 🔊 It was common gossip how he felt about her. 🔊 You miss a lot of office gossip when you have a day off work. 🔊 On Sundays all the men gather in the square to exchange local gossip.2 [countable usually singular] a conversation in which you exchange information with someone about other people’s lives and things that have happened 🔊 Phil’s in there, having a gossip with Maggie.3 [countable]RUMOUR/RUMOR someone who likes talking about other people’s private lives – used to show disapproval 🔊 Rick’s a terrible gossip.COLLOCATIONSADJECTIVES/NOUN + gossipthe latest gossipAnnie usually has all the latest gossip.juicy gossip (=interesting gossip)He said that he had some especially juicy gossip to tell us.hot gossip (=interesting gossip)What’s the latest hot gossip going round at work then?idle gossip (=gossip not based on facts)She had no time for idle gossip.common gossip (=gossip that everyone knows about)Rumours about her affairs had become common gossip.office gossipHe told her a few bits of office gossip which he thought might interest her.village gossip British English:She knew from village gossip how Harry had treated his first wife.malicious gossip (=unkind gossip that is likely to upset someone)Has someone been spreading malicious gossip?phrasesa piece of gossipI’ve got an interesting piece of gossip which might interest you.be the subject of gossip (=be talked about)His close friendship with Carol was the subject of gossip.verbsexchange gossip (=talk about other people and their private lives with someone)They used to meet up and exchange gossip.hear gossipHave you heard the latest gossip about Steve?listen to gossipHe was always willing to listen to gossip.spread gossipSomeone’s been spreading gossip about Lucy and Ian.gossip goes around (=it is told by one person to another)It was a small village, and any gossip went around very quickly.
Examples from the Corpus
gossipEliza Grierson was known as a gossip of Olympian standards.A lie is as good as the truth to a gossip.The government's prolonged sixteen-month silence over the Griffiths Report naturally led to much speculation, rumour and gossip.The public never seems to tire of Hollywood gossip.Recently her name has showed up a lot in gossip columns.But the Mirror has read a transcript of the 2year-old recording and found much of it to be inconsequential gossip.I got back from my vacation eager to hear all the latest gossip.Mrs Busby was always ready to exchange local gossip with the customers who came into her shop.I don't believe Liz had an affair with him. That's just malicious gossip.I heard an interesting piece of gossip about Beth Ann.Other gossip has Sun's low-end Tsunami box - due imminently - cast as Sunrgy.Those parliamentary gossips still in London enduring the boredom of the silly season waited in happy expectation for the scandal to break.Don't tell him anything private - he's a terrible gossip.Polly follows all the gossip about the royal family.The conversation began to drift towards gossip about their colleagues.The town gossips had been spreading rumours about Bruce for months.He loved to use gossip, half-truths, and lies to separate friends and to destroy relationships.piece of gossipOr a piece of gossip about her that he told some one else in a letter.One day Sam heard an interesting piece of gossip from some of the adult workers.
gossipgossip2 ●●○ verb [intransitive] 🔊 🔊 TALK TO somebodyto talk about other people’s behaviour and private lives, often including remarks that are unkind or untruegossip about 🔊 The whole town was gossiping about them.see thesaurus at talk→ See Verb table
Examples from the Corpus
gossipIt's best not to tell Frank anything. You know how he gossips.Those two old ladies sit there every day, gossiping about everyone in town.If people gossiped about her Fleather would never hear it.If you've been gossiping about some one, go to those you gossiped to and try to restore the person's reputation.Cocteau's jazz club was the spot where artists gossiped and drank.From what she had told me, Gail hung around with her girlfriends, gossiping and looking at boys.This is where the locals gather to gossip and talk politics.Sergeants Camb and Martin were gossiping in the foyer when he emerged from the lift.He didn't want to sit gossiping in the kitchen with that old slob of a cousin.But she might walk slowly, gossiping on the way, or even stop off at some other house to drink tea.Women did their shopping, gossiped, then went home to prepare the Sunday meals for their families.I wasn't doing anything important - just gossiping with a neighbour.
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Verb table
gossip
Simple Form
Present
I, you, we, theygossip
he, she, itgossips
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Past
I, you, he, she, it, we, theygossiped
Present perfect
I, you, we, theyhave gossiped
he, she, ithas gossiped
Past perfect
I, you, he, she, it, we, theyhad gossiped
Future
I, you, he, she, it, we, theywill gossip
Future perfect
I, you, he, she, it, we, theywill have gossiped
> View Less
Continuous Form
Present
Iam gossiping
he, she, itis gossiping
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you, we, theyare gossiping
Past
I, he, she, itwas gossiping
you, we, theywere gossiping
Present perfect
I, you, we, theyhave been gossiping
he, she, ithas been gossiping
Past perfect
I, you, he, she, it, we, theyhad been gossiping
Future
I, you, he, she, it, we, theywill be gossiping
Future perfect
I, you, he, she, it, we, theywill have been gossiping
> View Less