Longman Dictionary of Contemporary English homepage

Language: Old English
Origin: grimm

grim

adjective
     
grim
1 making you feel worried or unhappy [= harsh]:
the grim reality of rebuilding the shattered town
When he lost his job, his future looked grim.
Millions of Britons face the grim prospect (=something bad that will probably happen) of dearer home loans.
We received the grim news in silence.
2 looking or sounding very serious:
'I'll survive,' he said with a grim smile.
The child hung on to her arm with grim determination.
The police officers were silent and grim-faced.
3 British English informal very bad, ugly, or unpleasant:
The weather forecast is pretty grim.
They painted a grim picture of what life used to be like there.
a grim industrial town
4 [not before noun] informal ill:
Juliet felt grim through the early months of her pregnancy.
5

hold/hang on for/like grim death

British English informal to hold something very tightly because you are afraid
grimly adverb:
Arnold smiled grimly.
grimness noun [uncountable]

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