English version

have

From Longman Dictionary of Contemporary Englishhavehave1 /v, əv, həv; strong hæv/ ●●● S1 W1 auxiliary verb (past tense and past participle had /d, əd, həd; strong hæd/, third person singular has /z, əz, həz; strong hæz/) 🔊 🔊 1 XXused with past participles to form perfect tenses 🔊 Our guests have arrived. 🔊 Has anyone phoned? 🔊 We’ve been spending too much money. 🔊 I hadn’t seen him for 15 years. 🔊 ‘I hope you’ve read the instructions.’ ‘Yes, of course I have.’ 🔊 You haven’t done much, have you?2 somebody had better/best do something3 had somebody done something
Examples from the Corpus
haveI must have left my wallet at home.She had lived in Peru for 30 years.
havehave2 /hæv/ ●●● S1 W1 verb [transitive] 🔊 🔊 1 quality/feature (also have got especially British English)HAVE used to say what someone or something looks like, what qualities or features they possess etc 🔊 She has dark hair and brown eyes. 🔊 Sullivan’s music does have a certain charm. 🔊 You need to have a lot of patience to be a teacher. 🔊 Wild rice has a very nutty flavour. 🔊 He didn’t even have the courtesy to answer my letter.have it in you (=have the skill or special quality needed to do something) 🔊 You should have seen the way Dad was dancing – I didn’t know he had it in him!2 include/contain (also have got especially British English)HAVE to include or contain something or a particular number of things or people 🔊 Japan has a population of over 120 million. 🔊 How many pages has it got?have something in it/them 🔊 The tank still has water in it.3 own (also have got especially British English) spokenOWN used to say that someone owns something or that it is available for them to use 🔊 They used to have a Mercedes Benz. 🔊 Has your secretary got a fax machine? 🔊 Have you ever had your own business? 🔊 He’s a lovely dog – how long have you had him? 🔊 Can I have the car tonight, Dad?see thesaurus at own4 carry/hold (also have got especially British English) to be holding something or carrying it with you 🔊 Have you got a match? 🔊 Look out! He’s got a gun.have something on/with you 🔊 Have you got any money on you? 🔊 I’m afraid I don’t have my address book with me.GRAMMAR: Using the progressiveSenses 1-4 of have are not used in the progressive. Don’t say: I am having ... | It is having ...5 do something British EnglishDO to do somethinghave a look/walk/sleep/talk/think etc 🔊 We were just having a look around. 🔊 Are you going to have a swim?6 eat/drink/smokeEATDRINK to eat, drink, or smoke something 🔊 She sat down and had another drink. 🔊 Someone had been having a cigarette in the toilet.have lunch/a meal etc 🔊 I usually have breakfast at about seven o'clock.see thesaurus at eat7 experienceHAVE to experience something or be affected by something 🔊 We’ve been having a lot of difficulties with our new computer system. 🔊 I’m afraid your son has had a serious accident. 🔊 He is in hospital having treatment for a knee injury. 🔊 I hope you have a good holiday.have a good/terrible etc time 🔊 Thanks for everything – we had a great time.have somebody doing something 🔊 He found it quite natural to have people fussing over him.8 idea/feeling (also have got especially British English)THINK something/HAVE A THOUGHT to think of something or to experience a particular feeling 🔊 If you have any good ideas for presents, let me know. 🔊 I have lots of happy memories of my time in Japan. 🔊 He had an awful feeling of guilt.9 HAVEdisease/injury/pain (also have got especially British English) to suffer from a disease, injury, or pain 🔊 Sarah’s got a cold. 🔊 One of the victims had a broken leg.10 amount of time (also have got especially British English)AVAILABLE if you have a particular amount of time, it is available for you to do something 🔊 You have just 30 seconds to answer the question.have time (to do something) 🔊 I haven’t time to stop and talk just now.11 receive (also have got especially British English)GET to receive something 🔊 I had lots of phone calls.have something from somebody 🔊 Have you had any news yet from Graham? 🔊 I expect he had some help from his father.12 have your hair cut/your house painted etc13 have something stolen/broken/taken etc14 have something ready/done/finished etc15 in a position or state (also have got especially British English)PUT used to say that your body or something else is in a particular position or state, because you moved or did somethinghave something open/closed/on etc 🔊 I had my eyes half-closed. 🔊 Janice likes to have the window open. 🔊 She had her back to the door.have something doing something 🔊 He’s always got the stereo playing.16 HAVEfamily/friends (also have got especially British English) used to say that there is someone who is your relation or friend 🔊 She has an uncle in Wisconsin. 🔊 It was nice for Alice to have friends of her own age.17 job/duty (also have got especially British English)MUST to be employed in a particular job or to be responsible for doing something 🔊 Her boyfriend has a well-paid job. 🔊 The headteacher has responsibility for the management of the school.have something to do 🔊 I can’t stand here talking – I have work to do (=there is work that I must do).18 employ/be in charge of (also have got especially British English)JOB/TASK to employ or be in charge of a group of workers 🔊 Margaret Gillies currently has a team of 20 volunteers working for her.19 goods/rooms available (also have got especially British English)AVAILABLE if a shop or a hotel has goods or rooms, they are available for you to buy or use 🔊 Do you have any single rooms? 🔊 They didn’t have any sweaters in my size.20 have (got) somebody with you21 hold somebody (also have got especially British English)HOLD to hold someone violently by a part of their body 🔊 They had him by the throat.22 visitors/guestsVISIT if you have visitors or guests, they have come to your home, office etc 🔊 Sorry, I didn’t realize you had visitors. 🔊 We had friends to stay over the weekend.23 eventPARTY if you have an event such as a meeting, party, or concert, it happens because you have organized it 🔊 We’re having a party on Saturday – you’re very welcome to come.24 effectEFFECT/INFLUENCE to cause a particular result 🔊 a mistake that could have disastrous results 🔊 Cardew was having a bad influence on the other students.25 opportunityCHANCE/BY CHANCE used to say that an opportunity or choice is available for you 🔊 If you have the chance, you should go and see it – it’s a really good film. 🔊 Women managers have a choice as to whether they wear trousers or a skirt. 🔊 Last year I had the honour of meeting the Prince of Wales.26 babyBABY/HAVE A BABY if a woman has a baby, it is born from her body 🔊 Anna insisted on having the baby at home.27 make somebody do something a) CAUSEto affect someone in a way that makes them start doing somethinghave somebody laughing/crying etc 🔊 Within minutes he had the whole audience laughing and clapping. b) PERSUADETELL/ORDER somebody TO DO somethingto persuade or order someone to do somethinghave somebody doing something 🔊 She had me doing all kinds of jobs for her.have somebody do something especially American English 🔊 I’ll have Hudson show you to your room.28 have done with something29 rumour/legend/word has it30 have (got) something/somebody (all) to yourself31 sex informalSEX/HAVE SEX WITH to have sex with someone 🔊 I expect she’s had lots of men.32 have it off/away with somebodySPOKEN PHRASES33 can/could/may I have34 I’ll have/we’ll have35 offering somebody something used to offer something to someone 🔊 Have another sandwich. 🔊 Won’t you have a drink before you go? 🔊 Please have a seat, and the doctor will be right with you.36 won’t/can’t have something37 somebody had (got) it coming38 I’ve got it39 you have me there40 I’ll have you know41 have (got) it in for somebody42 somebody/something has had it43 be not having any (of that)44 somebody has been hadUSAGE: Have got, haveIn British spoken English, people usually use have got instead of have for many of its meanings. Have sounds more formal and is the usual choice in written English. You say: He's got a cold. You write: He has a cold.In questions in British spoken English, Have you got ...? is often used instead of Do you have ...? You say: Have you got his address? You write: Do you have his address?In negative sentences in British spoken English, you use haven't got or hasn't got. You say: He hasn't got any money. You write: He does not have any money.Have got is mainly used in the present tense. In the past tense you usually use had, and in the future you usually use will have.In American English, have got is much less common. It is used when you want to emphasize what you are saying: He's got a gun! It is also often used in the phrase have got to (=have to): We've got to go.In negative sentences, British speakers often say I haven't got ... where American speakers say I don't have ... In questions, British speakers say Have you got ...? where American speakers say Do you have ...? have on have (got) something against somebody/something have (got) somebody in have something out have somebody over have somebody up→ See Verb table
Examples from the Corpus
haveHow many pages does it have?"Have you got a garden in your new place?'' "Yes, we have.''How many of your students have a computer?Can I have a drink of water, please?Chris has a friend who knows Randy Travis.He said it was interesting, so I had a look.Here, I have a map."Do you have a phone here?'' "Yes sir, we do.''Don't worry, I had a shower this morning.Beth has an awful cold.Although she's eighty she has an excellent memory.Excuse me, do you have change for a dollar?Ahmad has five employees under him.Here, Tina, have some popcorn.Have you ever had pneumonia?Have you got a pen I could borrow?Have you got your own computer at home?Have you had lunch?Do you have your purse?have it in youI admired the way you refused to let him bully you - I didn't think you had it in you.Look at Steve dance - I didn't know he had it in him!No one thought I would win, but I knew I had it in me to do it if I really tried.He didn't have it in him.I don't think I would have it in me to start again with another group.No, I think we all have it in us, but they take intuition much more seriously than we do.We can understand plutonium and work out how to treat people who have it in them.You have it in you to awaken a very great love.You have it in you to drive a man mad.have something in it/themAlmost as if the very people who built and benefit most from the absurd complications of super.capitalism have lost faith in it.But they have Spirit in them.He points out that our veins have one-way valves in them.If she was running the same company for Virgin, shouldn't she have some shareholding in it?The FiBars have sugar in it.This is a young team and it is really important for the coaches to show we have confidence in them.Personally, I don't have much faith in them, especially those designed to alert the neighbourhood.Harry's life had changed too and he did not have room in it for Jack's problems.have something on/with youI knew only too well that tracheotomy was indicated here but I didn't have a tube with me.I shudder to think what kind of life I should have had with him.I trust you have your revolver with you.Now, tell me what you have done with Him?Well, I don't have anything on me, so she grabs my sunglasses and races away across the field.Well, we just got talking and she agreed to have dinner with me the following night.When Bradbury died before the age of thirty, most of the interest in the process seems to have perished with him.He should go out and have a beer with you, not just keep his cool with the unit...have a look/walk/sleep/talk/think etcThe companies have talked about cooperating on future products, these people say.You'd never have thought anyone would plant a bomb there.Those dealing with heart disease have looked for such clean-cut results in vain.One would have thought it was the congregation of a workhouse.This is something unique; and it is not surprising that somebody should have thought of the mystical chariot of Ezechiel.Well, can I have a sleep over?My parents must have thought so too because my father carefully locked the door and put the key in his briefcase.They have looked upon the bones of the prehistoric dead and seen evidence of a Stone Age holocaust.have lunch/a meal etcBut he would never fail to have a meal.In fact, I told him that when I got back from this holiday he must come round and have a meal.We then have a meal and return.I thought it was very important to have a meal together every day.I wish Marie was here - we could go in and have a meal together.That it seems pointless not to remain friends after so long, and ask him to have a meal with you.have somebody doing somethingWithin minutes he had the whole audience laughing and clapping.She had me doing all kinds of jobs for her.have time (to do something)Until you have time and money to build a barn, a rick-yard may be the only alternative.He says he will have time enough to relax and carouse when he's had a smash hit with his first novel.It was a shame he didn't have time to change out of his gardening clothes before he appeared on the show.It is unlikely the new government will have time to draft a budget.Pity I didn't have time to make bouillabaisse.If you do not have time to prepare breakfast it should not matter.The result is that under Higher Still you actually have time to teach.She occupies herself all day, the old woman decided, so that she will not have time to think.have something to doWe have a job to do.You must have lots to do.The only question is whether the Government have the will to do anything about them.You are going to have to learn to do that too, Michael.Caterers can be hired to serve food you have made and to do the cleanup afterward.Once again the change can have nothing to do with making the chapter more acceptable.Whatever happened, the last person he wanted to have anything more to do with was Eleanor Fuller.have somebody do somethingI'll have the bellboy take up your bags.
havehave3 ●●● S1 W3 verb, have to do something (also have got to do something especially British English) 🔊 🔊 1 MUSTif you have to do something, you must do it because it is necessary or because someone makes you do it 🔊 We don’t have to rush – there’s plenty of time. 🔊 I hate having to get up early in the morning. 🔊 If you earn more than £5,000, you will have to pay tax. 🔊 I’ve got to be at the hospital at 4 o'clock. 🔊 It’ll have to be on a Sunday. I’ll be working every other day.RegisterIn writing, people often prefer to say someone is forced to do something or is obliged to do something, as these sound more formal than have to do something: They had to pay tax on the full amount. → They were obliged to pay tax on the full amount. | Many businesses have had to close. → Many businesses have been forced to close.2 MUSTused to say that it is important that something happens, or that something must happen if something else is to happen 🔊 There has to be an end to the violence. 🔊 You’ve got to believe me! 🔊 There will have to be a complete ceasefire before the Government will agree to talks. 🔊 You have to be good to succeed in this game.3 SHOULD/OUGHT TOused to tell someone how to do something 🔊 First of all you have to mix the flour and the butter.4 SUREused to say that you are sure that something will happen or something is true 🔊 House prices have to go up sooner or later. 🔊 This has to be a mistake. 🔊 You have got to be joking! 🔊 No one else could have done it – it had to be Neville.5 used to suggest that someone should do something because you think it would be enjoyable or useful 🔊 You’ll have to come and meet my wife some time.6 spoken used when something annoying happens in a way that things always seem to happen 🔊 Of course, it had to happen today, when all the shops are shut.7 ANNOYSURPRISED spoken used to say that only one thing or person is good enough or right for someone 🔊 For Francesca it has to be the Ritz – nowhere else will do.8 do you have to do sth?9 I have to say/admit/confess must1→ See Verb table
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Verb table
have
Simple Form
Present
I, you, we, theyhave
he, she, ithas
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Past
I, you, he, she, it, we, theyhad
Present perfect
I, you, we, theyhave had
he, she, ithas had
Past perfect
I, you, he, she, it, we, theyhad had
Future
I, you, he, she, it, we, theywill have
Future perfect
I, you, he, she, it, we, theywill have had
> View Less
Continuous Form
Present
Iam having
he, she, itis having
> View More
you, we, theyare having
Past
I, he, she, itwas having
you, we, theywere having
Present perfect
I, you, we, theyhave been having
he, she, ithas been having
Past perfect
I, you, he, she, it, we, theyhad been having
Future
I, you, he, she, it, we, theywill be having
Future perfect
I, you, he, she, it, we, theywill have been having
> View Less
Verb table
have
Simple Form
Present
I, you, we, theyhave
he, she, ithas
> View More
Past
I, you, he, she, it, we, theyhad
Present perfect
I, you, we, theyhave had
he, she, ithas had
Past perfect
I, you, he, she, it, we, theyhad had
Future
I, you, he, she, it, we, theywill have
Future perfect
I, you, he, she, it, we, theywill have had
> View Less
Continuous Form
Present
Iam having
he, she, itis having
> View More
you, we, theyare having
Past
I, he, she, itwas having
you, we, theywere having
Present perfect
I, you, we, theyhave been having
he, she, ithas been having
Past perfect
I, you, he, she, it, we, theyhad been having
Future
I, you, he, she, it, we, theywill be having
Future perfect
I, you, he, she, it, we, theywill have been having
> View Less