Longman Dictionary of Contemporary English homepage

Date: 1600-1700
Language: French
Origin: ignorer 'not to know', from Latin, from ignarus 'not knowing, unknown', from in- 'not' + gnoscere 'to know'

ignore

verb
     
ig‧nore S2 W2 [transitive]
1 to deliberately pay no attention to something that you have been told or that you know about:
You can't ignore the fact that many criminals never go to prison.
problems which we can't afford to ignore
2 to behave as if you had not heard or seen someone or something:
The phone rang, but she ignored it.
Sam rudely ignored the question.
completely/totally ignore somebody/something
He had completely ignored her remark, preferring his own theory.
WORD CHOICE: WORD CHOICE:

ignore, be ignorant of, not know
If you ignore something, you know about it or have seen or heard it, but deliberately do not take notice of it We cannot ignore the problem.!! Do not use ignore to mean 'not know about something'. Use not know instead We don't know how famous people live their lives (NOT We ignore how famous people live their lives). You can also say that you are ignorant of something, especially when you should know about it They seem to be ignorant of the dangers involved.

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