English version

immemorial

From Longman Dictionary of Contemporary Englishimmemorialim‧me‧mo‧ri‧al /ˌɪməˈmɔːriəl◂/ adjective 🔊 🔊 LONG TIMEstarting longer ago than people can remember, or than written history showsfrom/since time immemorial 🔊 Markets have been held here since time immemorial.
Examples from the Corpus
immemorialHe had come a long way with the Elder, as had his family from time immemorial.Since time immemorial, boys have climbed the water tower.an immemorial customElementary teachers from time immemorial have used themes in their teaching.Its real origins lie deep in the immemorial history of the Near East.From time immemorial, it seems, pitching signs have been standard.These precedents encouraged lawyers to talk of the immemorial law of the Salian Franks under which women were excluded from the succession.Until Disestablishment in 1870 the archdeacons of Dromore were, from time immemorial, rectors of Seagoe.Cattle, herded down to it along drove-ways used from time immemorial, slowly graze across its moist levels.from/since time immemorialPeople have been gambling since time immemorial.An awl is an iron instrument used for piercing leather, but the word has been in punning use since time immemorial.He had come a long way with the Elder, as had his family from time immemorial.Then Harvey spoke about the danger of electrocution. Since time immemorial, boys have climbed the water tower.Elementary teachers from time immemorial have used themes in their teaching.Until Disestablishment in 1870 the archdeacons of Dromore were, from time immemorial, rectors of Seagoe.Cattle, herded down to it along drove-ways used from time immemorial, slowly graze across its moist levels.
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