English version

impenetrable

From Longman Dictionary of Contemporary Englishimpenetrableim‧pen‧e‧tra‧ble /ɪmˈpenətrəbəl/ adjective  1 ENTERimpossible to get through, see through, or get into The trees formed a dark and impenetrable barrier. the impenetrable blackness of the night2 DIFFICULTvery difficult or impossible to understand impenetrable legal jargonimpenetrably adverbimpenetrability /ɪmˌpenətrəˈbɪləti/ noun [uncountable]
Examples from the Corpus
impenetrablean impenetrable 25-page memoWhat she once considered oppressive about Joseph, his cold style and impenetrable attitude, now earned her respect.As she rounded the final corner, the trees were in front of her, a dark and impenetrable barrier hiding the house completely.Granted, the casual observer may dismiss this as impenetrable blarney.An impenetrable fog halted traffic.Their bushes form an impenetrable hedge.Which was further away from the real but impenetrable humanity of these black men and women?He would make the Britches impenetrable, tackle the dead trees and plant saplings.We followed their tracks down into the swamp where a recent clearcut had left impenetrable thickets of young fir.Feminist organizations and the media appeared almost impenetrable to us.impenetrable barrierYet some people seem to learn to live with imperfection and others find it an impenetrable barrier.A decade ago this was Checkpoint Charlie, one of the few gaps in an otherwise impenetrable barrier a hundred miles long.As she rounded the final corner, the trees were in front of her, a dark and impenetrable barrier hiding the house completely.A rose hedge can become a useful, impenetrable barrier if clipped regularly.But this normally impenetrable barrier is easily breached by fat-soluble ethanol molecules, which slip through like little ghosts.
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