English version

impose

From Longman Dictionary of Contemporary Englishimposeim‧pose /ɪmˈpəʊz $ -ˈpoʊz/ ●●○ W2 AWL verb  1 PUT[transitive] if someone in authority imposes a rule, punishment, tax etc, they force people to accept it The court can impose a fine.impose something on something/somebody The government imposed a ban on the sale of ivory.2 [transitive]FORCE somebody TO DO something to force someone to have the same ideas, beliefs etc as youimpose something on somebody parents who impose their own moral values on their children3 [intransitive] formalPROBLEM to expect or ask someone to do something for you when this is not convenient for themimpose on/upon We could ask to stay the night, but I don’t want to impose on them.4 PROBLEM[transitive] to have a bad effect on something or someone and to cause problems for themimpose a burden/hardship etc (on somebody/something) Military spending imposes a huge strain on the economy.RegisterIn everyday English, people usually say put a ban/tax/burden/strain on something rather than impose a ban/tax/burden/strain on something:The government put a higher tax on cigarettes.This puts a lot of strain on families.→ See Verb table
Examples from the Corpus
imposeNo, we'll find a motel - we don't want to impose.Section 47 imposes a positive duty on investigating authorities to see the child and to take legal action if access is denied.This was a great mistake, because in 1973 the Arabs did impose an embargo and made it stick.These gold bugs think you want gold standards, because they impose discipline, but who can complain?But he hated to impose for an entire week, with Marge nearly six months pregnant.Within days of being appointed office manager he had imposed his own working methods.Vaught is also reluctant to impose his will upon others.Publication of the article breached of an injunction imposed in 1997.Thousands of troops were sent to the region to impose order before the election.Teachers should try to avoid imposing their own beliefs on their students.We did not want to impose this restriction here but wanted to let the data reveal individual preferences.The changes imposed were just about as much as the Services could take at that time without loss of morale and fighting efficiency.impose something on somebodyChurches are not allowed to impose their beliefs on people, but they are allowed to practice their faith freely.Many countries imposed economic sanctions on South Africa during apartheid.impose on/uponSometimes a special tax is imposed on foreign residents.The music was written before the Conventional Rules were imposed on musicians.The National Citizens' Coalition has obtained a court order suspending the limits imposed on private citizens represented by the coalition.What penalties can be imposed on teachers who engage in an illegal strike?The second way of life is based upon the will of a minority forcibly imposed upon the majority.This is normally done by imposing upon the tenant a covenant to comply with regulations made from time by the landlord.What is certain is that the discipline imposed on them was more complex, more capricious and more cruel.They were more often obnoxious than not, impatient with me because my services had been essentially imposed upon them.I'm sorry if I imposed on you.impose a burden/hardship etc (on somebody/something)Despite their relatively high wages, these constraints had imposed burdens on working conditions.Does this impose a burden in terms of the capital-labour ratio being lower?Secondly, there were restrictive covenants affecting land and so imposing a burden on the land rather than on any person.Some of them impose burdens mainly on the private sector.We want an agreement that promotes business and does not impose burdens or barriers upon the business community.White House officials said that President Bush was loath to impose burdens on industry as the country began to emerge from recession.
From Longman Business Dictionaryimposeim‧pose /ɪmˈpəʊz-ˈpoʊz/ verb impose a ban/tax/fine etc to officially order that something should be forbidden, taxed etcThe city council can not impose a utility tax without voter approval.The US Commerce Department threatened to impose a 15% fee on subsidized lumber flooding US markets.→ See Verb table
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Verb table
impose
Simple Form
Present
I, you, we, theyimpose
he, she, itimposes
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Past
I, you, he, she, it, we, theyimposed
Present perfect
I, you, we, theyhave imposed
he, she, ithas imposed
Past perfect
I, you, he, she, it, we, theyhad imposed
Future
I, you, he, she, it, we, theywill impose
Future perfect
I, you, he, she, it, we, theywill have imposed
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Continuous Form
Present
Iam imposing
he, she, itis imposing
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you, we, theyare imposing
Past
I, he, she, itwas imposing
you, we, theywere imposing
Present perfect
I, you, we, theyhave been imposing
he, she, ithas been imposing
Past perfect
I, you, he, she, it, we, theyhad been imposing
Future
I, you, he, she, it, we, theywill be imposing
Future perfect
I, you, he, she, it, we, theywill have been imposing
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