English version

impressionable

From Longman Dictionary of Contemporary Englishimpressionableim‧pres‧sion‧a‧ble /ɪmˈpreʃənəbəl/ adjective  PERSUADEsomeone who is impressionable is easily influenced, especially because they are young The kids are at an impressionable age.
Examples from the Corpus
impressionableIain, like any impressionable adolescent, was always going to find the bad sister more exciting.I've always wanted to do martial arts - maybe I saw too many Jackie Chan movies at an impressionable age.What kind of impact will this movie have on impressionable kids?Such was the disturbed world in which the young impressionable Nasser was to take his first steps in politics in the 1930s.She had taken to growling menacingly at the more impressionable of the remedials to keep herself occupied.You-you impressionable teenager with a crush on the football captain and anxiety about your own masculinity-you just might be a born homosexual.Unfortunately, the show's message to millions of impressionable teens is that it's OK to take drugs.This is doubtful: the electorate, being composed of ordinary people, is less impressionable than Tory grandees.A sign of the recession or fear that these impressionable young booksellers might be contaminated by their publishing counterparts in some way?Perhaps the Giants felt his approach was not conducive to getting the most out of his staff, especially impressionable young pitchers.
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