Longman Dictionary of Contemporary English homepage

Date: 1300-1400
Language: Latin
Origin: , past participle of interrumpere, from rumpere 'to break'

interrupt

verb
     
in‧ter‧rupt
1 [intransitive and transitive] to stop someone from continuing what they are saying or doing by suddenly speaking to them, making a noise etc:
Will you stop interrupting me!
Sorry to interrupt, but I need to ask you to come downstairs.
2 [transitive] to make a process or activity stop temporarily:
My studies were interrupted by the war.
3 [transitive] if something interrupts a line, surface, view etc it stops it from being continuous
interruption noun [uncountable and countable]
We can talk here without interruption.
! Do not use interruption to mean a short period when students or workers can stop working and relax. Use break instead: Between the two classes there is a 15 minute break.

Dictionary pictures of the day
Do you know what each of these is called?
What is the word for picture 1? What is the word for picture 2? What is the word for picture 3? What is the word for picture 4?
Click on any of the pictures above to find out what it is called.

Explore our topic dictionary