Longman Dictionary of Contemporary English homepage

Date: 1300-1400
Origin: juggler (11-21 centuries), from Old French jogleour, from Latin joculari 'to make fun', from jocus; JOKE1

juggle

verb
     
juggle
Related topics: Daily Life
jug‧gle
1 [intransitive and transitive] to keep three or more objects moving through the air by throwing and catching them very quickly
juggle with
One guy was juggling with five balls.
2 [intransitive and transitive]D to try to fit two or more jobs, activities etc into your life, especially with difficulty
juggle something (with something)
It's hard trying to juggle a job with kids and the housework.
3 [transitive]BF to change things or arrange them in the way you want, or in a way that makes it possible for you to do something
juggle something around
If I juggle these appointments around, I can fit you in.

➔ balancing/juggling act

at act1 (12)

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