English version

kick off

From Longman Dictionary of Contemporary Englishkick off phrasal verb1 START TO HAPPEN, EXIST ETCSTART DOING somethingif a meeting, event, or a football game kicks off, it starts What time does the laser show kick off? The match kicks off at noon. with The series kicked off with an interview with Brando.2 informal if you kick off a discussion, meeting, event etc, you start it OK Marion, would you care to kick off?kick something ↔ off (with something) I’m going to kick off today’s meeting with a few remarks about the budget.3 kick somebody off something informal to remove someone from a team or group Joe was kicked off the committee for stealing funds.4 American English informal to die5 British English spoken if a fight kicks off, people start fighting I think it might kick off in here with all these football fans around. kick→ See Verb table
Examples from the Corpus
kick offIf the meeting kicks off on time, we should be finished by 12 o'clock.The carnival kicked off with a wonderful firework display.kick withPhelps kicked off an outstanding night's music with a beautifully played Mozart Symphony.The laibon kicks off with a creation myth.The company kicked off with a hefty dose of early nitrogen, which with hindsight was the right choice.On Sunday, the gastronomic action kicks off with a pancake breakfast sponsored by the Rotary Club.It will kick off with a seminar on diet and fitness before looking at every aspect of becoming a successful pro racer.Our annual conference kicked off with a speech from the President.The conference kicked off with a swingeing attack on local government reform by Arthur Midwinter, professor of politics at Strathclyde University.The campaign kicks off with advertising on Tesco Clubcard recipe cards and in health food trade titles.Let's kick off with an Indian meal somewhere, and go on to a club after that.The new series kicks off with brilliant action shots taken at SummerSlam, the record breaking Wembley event.Maybe we kicked off with that hot blonde who took her ... No.kick something ↔ off (with something)The stage area at the casino in Le Touquet was almost close enough to the tables to kick the glasses off.I took a couple of Tylenol with codeine, kicked my shoes off, and crawled into the folds of my quilt.He kicked his boots off and tried to grip with his toes.Otherwise they would kick them off and we'd lose them.You can kick the ball off the park when and where you want.
From Longman Business Dictionarykick something → off phrasal verb1[transitive] American EnglishFINANCE if an investment kicks off payments, it produces those payments for the investorSingle-state muni funds kick off income that is exempt not only from federal taxes but from state taxes as well.2[intransitive, transitive] informal if a meeting, event etc kicks off or you kick it off, it startsThe conference was scheduled to kick off at noon.The company will kick off its advertising campaign in the UK next week. kick→ See Verb table
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Verb table
kick
Simple Form
Present
I, you, we, theykick
he, she, itkicks
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Past
I, you, he, she, it, we, theykicked
Present perfect
I, you, we, theyhave kicked
he, she, ithas kicked
Past perfect
I, you, he, she, it, we, theyhad kicked
Future
I, you, he, she, it, we, theywill kick
Future perfect
I, you, he, she, it, we, theywill have kicked
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Continuous Form
Present
Iam kicking
he, she, itis kicking
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you, we, theyare kicking
Past
I, he, she, itwas kicking
you, we, theywere kicking
Present perfect
I, you, we, theyhave been kicking
he, she, ithas been kicking
Past perfect
I, you, he, she, it, we, theyhad been kicking
Future
I, you, he, she, it, we, theywill be kicking
Future perfect
I, you, he, she, it, we, theywill have been kicking
> View Less