English version

lecture

From Longman Dictionary of Contemporary Englishlecturelec‧ture1 /ˈlektʃə $ -ər/ ●●● S2 W3 noun [countable]  1 CLASS/LESSONa long talk on a particular subject that someone gives to a group of people, especially to students in a universityspeechlecture on He regularly gives lectures on modern French literature.see thesaurus at speech2 TELL somebody OFFan act of criticizing someone or warning them about something in a long serious talk, in a way that they think is unfair or unnecessarylecture on/about My father caught me and gave me a long lecture about the dangers of drink.COLLOCATIONSverbsgive a lecture (also deliver a lecture formal)She gave a fascinating lecture on crime in the 1800s.He delivered the lecture at the London School of Economics. do a lecture informal:He’s doing a lecture on modern poetry.go to a lecture (also attend a lecture formal)Have you been to any of Professor MacPherson’s lectures?I recently attended a lecture by a noted historian.listen to a lectureMost students spend about a quarter of their time listening to lectures.lecture + NOUNa lecture hall/room (also a lecture theatre British English)The lecture hall was packed.lecture notesCan I borrow your lecture notes?a lecture tour (=a trip that someone takes to many different places to give a lecture)He’s on a lecture tour of the US.phrasesa series of lectures (also a course of lectures British English)a series of lectures on the history of artadjectivesa public lecture (=a lecture which the general public are allowed to go to)He’s going to deliver a public lecture on politics in the Middle East.an illustrated lecture (=a lecture with pictures such as slides)Mrs Robinson gave a fascinating illustrated lecture on Spanish history.
Examples from the Corpus
lecturea lecture on the causes of the Russian RevolutionThe old dining-room is now a brass rubbing centre and the drawing-room is used for meetings and lectures.The first lecture was due to start in half an hour - time enough for what she had to do.She launched into another one of her lectures about why we should always do our homework.Professor Blair is giving a series of lectures on Einstein's theories.Even if she fails to turn up for her next set of lectures there is nothing we can do but not pay her.These hotels provided musical afternoons, teas, bridge parties, lectures, dances, and sports facilities.He was largely self-taught through wide reading and attendance at public lectures.No scientific lecture is ever given without slides or other visual aids, especially if chemical structures are to be shown.The lecture, starting at 9: 30 a. m., is free.lecture onThe journey culminated in a Friday night debate where Patten gave a lecture on proper posture.Twenty years later, a lecture on the Copernican system was given in Rome to the pope, who approved.a lecture on economicsHe might well be, especially in a public manifestation, lecturing on Cosmopolis, an old bore.Look, I don't need lectures on how to use my own camera.He enters the system ingenuously contemplating the awesome responsibility that underlies lectures on the appropriate use of deadly force.Peter of Corbeil was a theologian who lectured on scripture and was famous as a preacher.lecture on/aboutThe journey culminated in a Friday night debate where Patten gave a lecture on proper posture.Twenty years later, a lecture on the Copernican system was given in Rome to the pope, who approved.He might well be, especially in a public manifestation, lecturing on Cosmopolis, an old bore.He enters the system ingenuously contemplating the awesome responsibility that underlies lectures on the appropriate use of deadly force.Peter of Corbeil was a theologian who lectured on scripture and was famous as a preacher.
lecturelecture2 ●●○ AWL verb  1 [transitive]TELL somebody OFF to talk angrily or seriously to someone in order to criticize or warn them, in a way that they think is unfair or unnecessary I wish you’d stop lecturing me!lecture somebody about/on something He began to lecture us about making too much noise.2 [intransitive]TEACH to talk to a group of people on a particular subject, especially to students in a universitylecture on He lectures on European art at Manchester University.see thesaurus at teach→ See Verb table
Examples from the Corpus
lectureIn 1955 Miss Paterson was invited to lecture and conduct courses for teachers in Montreal and at Yale.Before his retirement he lectured at the Institut Pasteur.He was lectured by the headmaster in front of the whole school.Pena was roundly criticized by senators who lectured him about public grandstanding and insufficient attention to safety concerns.I have never lectured in a finer classroom.For many years Dr Thornton lectured in Economics at University College.She's always lecturing me on bad manners.She lectures on Shakespeare at Edinburgh University.After the violence on the field, the manager lectured the team about acceptable standards of behaviour.But I didn't mean to lecture you, old thing.lecture somebody about/on somethingBarry often lectured schoolchildren about the dangers of drugs.
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Verb table
lecture
Simple Form
Present
I, you, we, theylecture
he, she, itlectures
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Past
I, you, he, she, it, we, theylectured
Present perfect
I, you, we, theyhave lectured
he, she, ithas lectured
Past perfect
I, you, he, she, it, we, theyhad lectured
Future
I, you, he, she, it, we, theywill lecture
Future perfect
I, you, he, she, it, we, theywill have lectured
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Continuous Form
Present
Iam lecturing
he, she, itis lecturing
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you, we, theyare lecturing
Past
I, he, she, itwas lecturing
you, we, theywere lecturing
Present perfect
I, you, we, theyhave been lecturing
he, she, ithas been lecturing
Past perfect
I, you, he, she, it, we, theyhad been lecturing
Future
I, you, he, she, it, we, theywill be lecturing
Future perfect
I, you, he, she, it, we, theywill have been lecturing
> View Less