English version


From Longman Dictionary of Contemporary English
Related topics: Law
liableli‧a‧ble /ˈlaɪəbəl/ ●○○ adjective [not before noun]  1 liable to do something2 SCLRESPONSIBLElegally responsible for the cost of somethingliable for people who are liable for income tax at a higher rate3 EFFECT/INFLUENCElikely to be affected by a particular kind of problem, illness etc syn proneliable to You’re more liable to injury when you don’t get regular exercise.4 lawSCL likely to be legally punished or forced to do something by lawliable to/for Anyone found trespassing is liable to a maximum fine of $100.
Examples from the Corpus
liableCan schools be held liable for educational malpractice?It was a remarkable contrast from last Tuesday night, when the same jury found Simpson liable for the slayings.People who have a second property may also be liable for the Standard Community Charge/Poll Tax.She is now liable for the wasted costs of her abandoned case - more than £1,000.The defendants were held not liable for this injury, as the plaintiff's unreasonable conduct broke the chain of causation.N.B. Charges are liable to be reviewed annually.Damn, boy, you re liable to get a flat going that speed.Inspector: I must warn that you may be liable under the Trades Descriptions Act.liable toParticipants who break any conditions are liable to arrest, conviction or a, 400 fine.But the hatred they aroused meant that they were liable to be brutally slaughtered if captured afterwards.The Blackshirts deliberately concentrated on those areas where there were liable to be violent counter-demonstrations.Prostitutes are particularly liable to infection.Schools will therefore be liable to lose pupils and funds if they fail to satisfy parents.This shows all those who are liable to pay community charge and specifies the particular type the individual will pay.Accountants will be held liable to third parties with whom they have no contractual or fiduciary relationship.Clerical Medical is liable to United Kingdom tax on the income and certain gains arising from the assets backing this policy.Act 1974 is liable to unlimited fines and/or up to two years imprisonment after conviction by a Crown Court.liable to/forAll it is liable to do is alienate your supporters.A dead body is liable to do that.Under our law, a subsidiary can go bankrupt and normally the parent company will not be liable for its debts.Armed forces: No standing army since 1868; citizens under 60 liable to military service in emergency.This shows all those who are liable to pay community charge and specifies the particular type the individual will pay.With only a few exceptions all those aged 18 or over are liable to pay the same basic charge.He may find himself liable for taxes that proper understanding would have enabled him to avoid.He has been found liable for two brutal slayings, but is not a criminal in the eyes of the law.
From Longman Business Dictionaryliableli‧a‧ble /ˈlaɪəbəl/ adjective [not before a noun]LAW1legally responsible for paying somethingliable forThe troubled company will be liable for about $52 million in back taxes and penalties.2likely to be legally punished or forced to do something by lawliable to somebodyThe firm admitted no wrongdoing and therefore they were not liable to anyone for the losses that had occurred.liable for somethingThe appeals court ruled that it would hold tobacco companies liable for illnesses related to smoking.
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