English version

look

From Longman Dictionary of Contemporary Englishlooklook1 /lʊk/ ●●● S1 W1 verb  1 see [intransitive]LOOK AT to turn your eyes towards something, so that you can see it We sneaked out while Jessie’s mom wasn’t looking. If you look carefully you can see that the painting represents a human figure. Gina covered her eyes, afraid to look.look at ‘It’s time we left, ’ Ian said, looking at his watch. The men all turned to look at her as she entered the room.look away/over/down etc Dad looked up from his paper and smiled. ‘We can’t go out in this weather, ’ said Bob, looking out of the window.GRAMMAR: Prepositions with lookYou look at someone or something: She was looking at the baby.I looked at the screen. Don’t say: She was looking to the baby. | I looked to the screen. If you look to someone, you depend on them: He always looked to his father for advice. 2 search [intransitive]LOOK FOR to try to find something I looked everywhere but Jimmy was nowhere to be found.look for Could you help me look for my contact lens? If you’re looking for a bargain, try the local market.look in/under/between etc Try looking under the bed.3 seem [linking verb]APPEARANCE to seem From the way things look at the moment, the Republicans are unlikely to win this election.look good/bad etc The future’s looking good.it looks as if/as though/like (=it seems likely that) It looks as if it might rain later. It looks like they won’t be needing us anymore. You made me look really stupid in front of all my friends!4 appearance [linking verb] to have a particular appearance How do I look?look tired/happy/sad etc You look tired. You should go to bed.look as if/as though/like He looked as if he hadn’t washed for a week. What did the man look like? My sister doesn’t look anything like me. look like a million dollars at million(4)GRAMMAR: Linking verbsLook is a linking verb in meanings 3 and 4. This type of verb links the subject of the sentence with an adjective or noun: It looks windy outside.You look beautiful.She made him look a fool.5 look daggers at somebody6 look somebody up and down7 look somebody in the eye8 look down your nose at somebody/something9 look the other way10 look no further11 face a direction [intransitive always + adverb/preposition]OPPOSITE/FACE if a building looks in a particular direction, it faces that direction The cabin looks east, so we get the morning sun.12 look before you leap13 be looking to do something14 look under the bonnetSPOKEN PHRASES15 look16 look out!17 look at that!18 look who’s here!19 don’t look now20 look what you’re doing/look where you’re going etc21 look what you’ve done!22 look here23 (I’m) just lookingTHESAURUSlook to turn your eyes towards someone or something, so that you can see themYou should never look directly at the sun.After a while, he turned and looked at me.have/take a look especially spoken to look at something quickly, especially in order to find or check somethingI’ll have a look in my desk. Take a look at this!glance to look at someone or something for a short time and then look quickly awayDamien glanced nervously at his watch.peek/peep (also take a peek/peep) to look quickly at something – used especially when you are not supposed to look, or when you are looking through a small gapThe door was open so he peeked inside.Katy peeped at her birthday present on the table.peer to look very carefully, especially because you cannot see wellKenji was peering at the screen.glare to look at someone in an angry wayShe glared at me as I got up to leave.stare to look at someone or something for a long time without moving your eyesIt’s rude to stare.She stared straight into the camera.gaze to look at someone or something for a long time, often without realizing that you are doing itShe gazed out of the window.He lay on his bed gazing at the ceiling.gape to look at someone or something for a long time, usually with your mouth open, because you are very shocked or surprisedPeople gaped at him with wide-open mouths.regard formal to look at someone or something, especially in a particular wayHe regarded her steadily. look after somebody/something look ahead look around look at somebody/something look back look down on something/somebody look for somebody/something look forward to something look in look into something look on look something ↔ out look out for somebody/something look something/somebody ↔ over look round look through somebody/something look to somebody/something look up look up to somebody→ See Verb table
Examples from the Corpus
lookThe teacher stopped and looked around to see if there were any questions.It looks as if we are going to need more help."You were a hippie?" she asked, looking at her father in disbelief."Come on, it's time to go, " he said, looking at his watch.Look at me when I'm talking to you.When she looked back at the road, the red saloon was coming towards her.Doesn't she look beautiful!If you look closely, you can see ducks at the edge of the lake.It looks dumb now, and it will look a lot dumber later.I've looked everywhere, but I can't find my gloves.Do these jeans make me look fat?He took his seat in coach, and after an hour or so began to look for them.He was also looking for ways to satisfy the recurrent Treasury demands for economy.New buildings look good, but often money is better spent on people.He sent one of his aides to California to ask Wilson to be chairman of the committee and to look him over.Look, I'm very serious about this.That book looks interesting.She's really pretty - she looks like a model.The burglar was holding what looked like a shotgun.That coat looks nice and warm. Where did you get it?Tom looked out the window over the dry, barren landscape.The permed young man and the woman in red exchanged glances, both looking quite abashed.I'm glad you've shaved off that beard. It makes you look ten years younger!Look, there are some swans on the river.I always look through the peephole before I open the door for anyone.Did you look under the bed?Now some of them look unkempt, neglected, despite the fine new houses and gardens which are springing up.The cake didn't look very good, but it tasted all right.look at"I have to go, " Mel said, looking at his watch.Look at me, Mommy!look forI spent months looking for a job, with no luck.Can you help me? I'm looking for a place to stay.Hiking companions who survive a slide should look for, and dig for, their missing partner, Ray said.Behind each star was a moonbeam, some mischievous, some sad; all of them worth looking for and recognizing.Traditionally, we have looked for causes of learning difficulty in the child.She decided to go to the ladies' room and look for him on the way.It is actively looking for more pilot schemes to identify the greater efficiencies needed and the best options available for waste collection.The next step: Move down the food chain and look for retail partners such as drugstores.I'm looking for Simon -- have you seen him?I've been looking everywhere for that key! Where did you find it?In the near future, look for the Giants to be playing in downtown San Francisco and the 49ers on the Peninsula.It will be looking for widely based skills but will still be skill-orientated.The company is looking for young, enthusiastic graduates to work in its sales department.look good/bad etcBut for now the view looks good.Coming off the combine at 15% moisture, he says it looked good.It doesn't just look bad.The report is not part of a plot hatched by the Opposition to make the Government look bad.They also knew that if the information came out through you, their boss might look bad.I want my baby looking good for me.What makes you look good, makes him or her look good, too.That looks good on the stat page, but Jody knows just how flimsy it is.look tired/happy/sad etcShe sighed then, and sat back; she looked tired.Swallow looks tired and careworn and slightly seedy.This particular Tuesday Georgina Taylor came in looking tired and drawn.If you use graphics that people have seen on other Web sites, it makes your site look tired and uninspired.Emma thought he looked tired, and wondered who was taking care of him.She looked sad; concerned for me, I thought.I did not look happy; they were worried for me.He looked tired, which he didn't usually do.
looklooka) CAREFULused to tell someone to look at something that you think is interesting, surprising etc Look! There’s a fox! b) ATTENTIONused to get someone’s attention so that you can suggest something or tell them something Look. Why don’t you think about it and give me your answer tomorrow? Look, I’ve had enough of this. I’m going home. look
Examples from the Corpus
lookLook! There's a bluejay!
looklook2 ●●● S1 W1 noun  1 look at [countable usually singular]LOOK AT an act of looking at somethinghave/take a look (at somebody/something) Let me have a look at that – I think it’s mine. Take a good look at the photo and see if you recognize anyone in it. I took one look at the coat and decided it wasn’t worth £50.have/take a look around (also have/take a look round British English) (=look at all the things in a particular place) I have a special interest in old houses. Do you mind if I take a look around?2 expression [countable]EXPRESSION ON somebody'S FACE an expression that you make with your eyes or facegive somebody a look Mike gave him such a severe look he didn’t dare argue. Why has Jake been giving me dirty looks (=unfriendly looks) all morning?3 consider [singular] an act of examining something and thinking about ithave/take a look (at somebody/something) Have you had a chance to take a look at my proposal yet? I asked the vet to have a quick look at the puppies as well. It’s time to take a fresh look at the old problem of low pay. This month, take a long hard look (=examine very carefully) at where your money is going.4 search [singular] an attempt to find something I can’t find them anywhere. Have a look yourself. She had a good look (=searched carefully) through the files.5 appearance [countable usually singular]APPEARANCE the appearance that someone or something has The area has a very seedy look to it. Mr Flynn had a tired, ill look in his eyes.not like the look of somebody/something (=think that something bad has happened or will happen because of something’s appearance) We should turn back now. It’s getting dark and I don’t like the look of those rain clouds.6 way something seems [countable] the way something seems to be The neighbours are back from holiday by the looks of it (=that is how it seems). I don’t like the look of this new policy (=I do not like the way it seems).7 looks8 fashion [singular]DCFASHIONABLE a particular style in clothes, hair, furniture etc The hippy look is back again.9 if looks could killTHESAURUSlook an act of looking at somethingLet me have a look at the map.I took a quick look around the room.glance a quick look at something before looking away againSusan cast a quick glance at me (=she looked quickly at me).He could not resist a sidelong glance (=quickly looking to the side) to see what was happening on the other side of the road.glimpse a short look at someone or something in which you do not see them very clearlyFans were hoping to catch a glimpse of the singer as he left the hotel.I had only a fleeting glimpse (=a very quick look) of the two men as they ran away.gaze a long steady lookEddie fixed his gaze on the floor.She looked up and met his gaze (=looked at him when he was looking at her).stare a long direct look, especially in an unfriendly way or in a way that shows you are surprisedHe was watching me with a cold stare.My cheery ‘Good Morning’ was met with a blank stare (=a stare which shows no emotion).glare an angry look at someoneShe gave him a hostile glare as he entered the room.frown a confused or annoyed look ‘Anyway, ’ she said with a frown, ‘I don’t see how there could be a connection.’
Examples from the Corpus
lookHer long straight hair and dark eye make-up give her a sort of late-'60s look.After winning, she had a look of pure joy on her face.Oh, well ... You will have a look at the lines over the weekend, won't you?She learnt a look and a posture and a set of adjectives which passed for being hip in the Village.A look of relief crossed his face.A look passed between the two men as George took the loafers.He normally wore a slightly amused look on his round face.Here's a brief look at some of the problems we'll be facing in the coming year.She's been giving me dirty looks all morning. What have I done wrong?I was getting disapproving looks from the people around me.He's trying for a '70s disco look.When the shrieks of his gang became too much, he lifted his hand and his face took on a furious look.As he passed the window, he saw Percy standing at the cash register with a hurt look.Sarah needed only one look at her daughter's face to know something was wrong.She has a pensive, almost sad look about her.Sheila nodded and gave him a sympathetic look.A kiss-and-tell look behind the scenes of a sport always turns heads with book publishers.The text is fine but the look of the page is all wrong.Mrs. Moody had it in for me - I could tell by the look in her eyes.From the look of it, I'd say the chair was about 100 years old, maybe 150.Sapporo, Japan, has the look of a Wisconsin city in winter.You should have seen the look on his face when I told him I was leaving.Computer graphics gave the creature a watery look.have/take a look (at somebody/something)Using eight criteria that help define the risk-reward equation, Bloomberg takes a look at Albers and his fund.In the gloom he must have looked like a ghost.The people of Carlo were to be allowed to take a look at the hardware to which they were hosts.I went out on to the roof to have a look and at first I could see nothing amiss.I wanted to have a look at them.I went to have a look at what he'd been doing.It was then that I suggested that we take a look at the Stillman apartment.give somebody a lookNelson began an extended housecleaning that by 1991 gave them the look of an intriguing if flawed contender.Minna pulled away and gave me a look that was part triumph and part astonishment.Franco gave them a look which might have been faintly disapproving.He gave me a look which made me wonder whether Mavis hadn't, after all, spilled the beans.I mean, she didn't ask anything, she just gave me a look when I got back.Then she gave me this look.To give a harmonious look to the room, the living and dining areas have been decorated in the same style.have/take a look (at somebody/something)Using eight criteria that help define the risk-reward equation, Bloomberg takes a look at Albers and his fund.In the gloom he must have looked like a ghost.The people of Carlo were to be allowed to take a look at the hardware to which they were hosts.I went out on to the roof to have a look and at first I could see nothing amiss.I wanted to have a look at them.I went to have a look at what he'd been doing.It was then that I suggested that we take a look at the Stillman apartment.Have a lookUnderneath I've got the scrapbooks. Have a look.Oh, one more thing. Have a look in Who's Who while you're there.not like the look of somebody/somethingRachaela did not like the look of it by night.by the looks of itAnd all alone by the looks of it.
From Longman Business Dictionarylooklook /lʊk/ verb look up→ See Verb table
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Verb table
look
Simple Form
Present
I, you, we, theylook
he, she, itlooks
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Past
I, you, he, she, it, we, theylooked
Present perfect
I, you, we, theyhave looked
he, she, ithas looked
Past perfect
I, you, he, she, it, we, theyhad looked
Future
I, you, he, she, it, we, theywill look
Future perfect
I, you, he, she, it, we, theywill have looked
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Continuous Form
Present
Iam looking
he, she, itis looking
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you, we, theyare looking
Past
I, he, she, itwas looking
you, we, theywere looking
Present perfect
I, you, we, theyhave been looking
he, she, ithas been looking
Past perfect
I, you, he, she, it, we, theyhad been looking
Future
I, you, he, she, it, we, theywill be looking
Future perfect
I, you, he, she, it, we, theywill have been looking
> View Less