English version

loot

From Longman Dictionary of Contemporary Englishlootloot1 /luːt/ verb [intransitive, transitive] 🔊 🔊 STEALto steal things, especially from shops or homes that have been damaged in a war or riot 🔊 Shops were looted and burned. —looter noun [countable] —looting noun [uncountable]→ See Verb table
Examples from the Corpus
loot• Seven thousand people were arrested, 1,300 buildings were destroyed and 2,700 businesses were looted.• His store was broken into and looted during the riot.• As the army advanced toward Mantes it burned and looted everything that lay in its path.• The movement, which is thought to have 4,000 fighters, is kept alive with guns and money looted from government stocks.• Bathore is armed to the teeth, from pistols to anti-tank guns looted from the government.• As a means of survival, these soldiers resorted to the rebels' strategy of terrorizing and looting from the hapless civilians.• The sailors attacked stores owned by blacks and looted shooting galleries for rifles and ammunition.• Rioters looted stores and set fires.• He refused to let his army enter and loot the city.• Sometimes they looted the dead, sometimes they honoured them.• Local people subsequently entered the site in order to loot the metal containers holding the pesticides, and simply poured the contents away.
Related topics: Army
lootloot2 noun [uncountable] 🔊 🔊 1 PMAgoods taken by soldiers from a place where they have won a battle syn plunder2 informalSTEAL goods or money that have been stolen syn spoils3 informalGET things that you have bought or been given in large amounts – used humorously 🔊 Jodie came home from the mall with bags of loot.
Examples from the Corpus
loot• In full view of our cameras, looters calmly walked off with TVs, radios, and VCRs.• It was more probable she did not trust me enough to show the buried loot.• Oliver turned out his pockets and spread out his loot on the ground.• Additional police officers were put on the street to prevent looting.• Though depleted by robbery in Thrace on the way home, Vulso's loot astonished the Romans for its size and quality.• I'd love to win the lottery and take home all that loot.• Two weeks later, police found the loot hidden in an abandoned warehouse.• The £1,000 worth of gifts were part of the loot taken in a raid on a courier depot at Leicester.• Virgil had cut the same for Glover, who had grabbed up burlap to hold his share of the loot.• The gunman stuffed the loot into a paper bag and ran outside to a waiting car.
LootLoot trademark 🔊 🔊 a magazine, sold in the UK and the US, which only contains advertisements. It is typically used by people who want to sell their cars or old furniture, rent their homes, buy a house etc. It also appears on the Internet.From Longman Business Dictionarylootloot /luːt/ noun [uncountable] informal old-fashioned goods or money that have been stolen
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Verb table
loot
Simple Form
Present
I, you, we, theyloot
he, she, itloots
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Past
I, you, he, she, it, we, theylooted
Present perfect
I, you, we, theyhave looted
he, she, ithas looted
Past perfect
I, you, he, she, it, we, theyhad looted
Future
I, you, he, she, it, we, theywill loot
Future perfect
I, you, he, she, it, we, theywill have looted
> View Less
Continuous Form
Present
Iam looting
he, she, itis looting
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you, we, theyare looting
Past
I, he, she, itwas looting
you, we, theywere looting
Present perfect
I, you, we, theyhave been looting
he, she, ithas been looting
Past perfect
I, you, he, she, it, we, theyhad been looting
Future
I, you, he, she, it, we, theywill be looting
Future perfect
I, you, he, she, it, we, theywill have been looting
> View Less