English version

medium term

From Longman Dictionary of Contemporary Englishmedium termˈmedium ˌterm noun [singular] 🔊 🔊 SHORT TIMEthe period of time a few weeks or months ahead of the presentshort-term, long-termin the medium term 🔊 The company’s prospects look good in the medium term. 🔊 medium-term investments
Examples from the Corpus
medium termImplementing them means we have to resort to some tough measures in the short and medium term.They could expect to receive a given level of real resources and plan accordingly for the medium term.It hopes to build its membership up to between 100 and 300 companies in the medium term.Many traders and economists still believe the dollar is likely to head higher in the medium term.For these discussions to take place in an effective manner accurate forecasts are needed over the medium term.Politically, however, this is the least likely in the near to medium term.This would require political will at the top, informed popular support and preparedness for the short to medium term consequences.in the medium termIt hopes to build its membership up to between 100 and 300 companies in the medium term.Baker-style rescheduling and new money might have cut short-term financing needs, but could make no difference in the medium term.With interest rates set to fall in the medium term this must augur well for values.The company's prospects look good in the medium term.Many traders and economists still believe the dollar is likely to head higher in the medium term.The only way to defeat inflation in the medium term is to raise productivity substantially.The market believes strong growth prospects are limited in the medium term and the stock fell 11p to 456p.
From Longman Business Dictionarymedium-termˈmedium-term adjective [only before a noun] not happening or making a profit immediately, but not over a very long period of timea medium-term loanIt is possible to get some quite good yields on medium-term bonds. compare long-term, short-term