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Language: Old English
Origin: meltan

melt

verb
     
melt
1

become liquid

[intransitive and transitive] if something solid melts or if heat melts it, it becomes liquid [↪ freeze, thaw]:
It was warmer now, and the snow was beginning to melt.
Melt the butter in a saucepan.
2

disappear

[intransitive] also melt away to gradually disappear:
Opposition to the government melted away.
His anger slowly melted.
3

become less angry

[intransitive] to become less angry and begin to feel more gentle and sympathetic:
She melted under his gaze.
My heart just melted when I saw her crying.
4

melt in your mouth

DF if food melts in your mouth, it is soft and tastes very nice
5

melt into somebody's arms/embrace

literary to allow someone to hold you in their arms and feel that you love them:
Closing her eyes, she melted into his embrace.

➔ butter wouldn't melt in somebody's mouth

at butter1 (2)

melt away

phrasal verb
1 if a crowd of people melts away, the people gradually leave:
The demonstrators melted away at the first sign of trouble.
2 to gradually disappear:
Her determination to take revenge slowly melted away.

melt something ↔ down

phrasal verb
to heat a metal object until it becomes a liquid, especially so that you can use the metal again:
A lot of the gold was melted down and used for making jewellery.

melt into something

phrasal verb
1 to gradually change into something else:
Her irritation melted into pity.
2 to gradually become hidden by something:
He is trying to melt into the background.

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