English version

mine

From Longman Dictionary of Contemporary Englishminemine1 /maɪn/ ●●● S1 pronoun [possessive form of ‘I’] 🔊 🔊 XXused by the person speaking or writing to refer to something that belongs to or is connected with himself or herselfmy 🔊 It was Glen’s idea, not mine. 🔊 ‘Is that your car?’ ‘No, mine is parked over the road.’ 🔊 You’ve got good legs – mine are too thin. 🔊 His English is better than mine.of mine 🔊 I want you to meet an old friend of mine.
Examples from the Corpus
friend of mineHe manages a house for a friend of mine.He named a man who, as I have said, was a very close friend of mine.He is a very good friend of mine and a good coach.A friend of mine dresses entirely in Harrods, bought in the January sales.A friend of mine had a son called Rick, who was learning brick-laying at a local college.A friend of mine has also installed the same application recently, yet experiences no such problem.Another labor lawyer, a friend of mine, sent me a copy.A good friend of mine was wounded; there were a bunch of people hurt.
Related topics: Industry, Bombs & terrorism
minemine2 ●●○ W3 noun [countable] 🔊 🔊 1 TIDIGa deep hole or holes in the ground that people dig so that they can remove coal, gold, tin etcminingcoal/gold/copper etc mine 🔊 one of the largest coal mines in the countryin/down a mine 🔊 the time when children used to work down the mines2 SCBa type of bomb that is hidden just below the ground or under water and that explodes when it is touched 🔊 They learnt how to lay mines (=put them in place). 🔊 The ship struck a mine and sank. landmine3 a mine of information (about/on something)
Examples from the Corpus
mineBut Wheal Jane, Cornwall's biggest mine, has announced that it wants to extend its workings.He was scarcely out of school before he had patented a rock-boring machine for coal mines.Before World War I more than a million workers labored in the coal mines of Great Britain.Deliberately he walked into the minefield, triggering off every mine and thus absorbing in his own body the entire explosion.an old gold mineThe world price for tin is high and so companies have been opening new larger mines in Cornwall.The barrier between the mines could be tunnelled through and an escape route created.In it are the different specimens of salt which are found in the mine, some of the red and white crystals.Nothing has yet happened in the mines.in/down a mineAnd when I was growing I dreamed about what I wanted to do in mine.Here in a world where she never existed, with people who do not exist in mine.I shook hands with her, startled how bony and warm her hand felt in mine.Second, gold is found in mines.I took her hand in mine and it was warm, and I felt still that strong persistent throb of life.Oliver Ingraham almost draped his hand in mine.I felt an unusual twinge of pity for him and reached out and clasped one of his hands in mine.He was a partner in a major firm and a friend of the partners in mine.lay minesWe were taught about hand grenades and explosives, and how to set ambushes and lay mines in the most effective pattern.
Related topics: Industry, Bombs & terrorism
minemine3 ●○○ verb (mined, mining) 🔊 🔊 1 [intransitive, transitive]TIDIG to dig large holes in the ground in order to remove coal, gold etc 🔊 Copper has been mined here since the sixteenth century. 🔊 This area has been mined for over 300 years.mine for 🔊 The company first started mining for salt in 1851. Grammar Mine is often passive in this meaning when used as a transitive verb.2 [transitive]SCB to hide bombs in the sea or under the ground 🔊 All the roads leading to the village had been mined. Grammar Mine is usually passive in this meaning.
→ See Verb table
Examples from the Corpus
mineThe border is heavily mined.Most of the new settlers came here to mine for gold.Simon mines his childhood experiences for his plays.Lead has been mined in this area for hundreds of years.The Chechen rebels can still mount hit-and-run attacks, mining roads and ambushing convoys.The church was built by Don Jose de la Borda, who made his fortune mining silver.mine forExplorers have been mining for gold in this area for several years.
From Longman Business Dictionaryminemine1 /maɪn/ noun [countable] a deep hole or series of holes that are dug in the ground in order to find gold, coal, diamonds etcThe closure of the coal mines caused a lot of unemployment in the area.minemine2 verb [intransitive, transitive] to dig holes or passages under the ground in order to obtain gold, coal, diamonds etc→ See Verb table
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Verb table
mine
Simple Form
Present
I, you, we, theymine
he, she, itmines
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Past
I, you, he, she, it, we, theymined
Present perfect
I, you, we, theyhave mined
he, she, ithas mined
Past perfect
I, you, he, she, it, we, theyhad mined
Future
I, you, he, she, it, we, theywill mine
Future perfect
I, you, he, she, it, we, theywill have mined
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Continuous Form
Present
Iam mining
he, she, itis mining
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you, we, theyare mining
Past
I, he, she, itwas mining
you, we, theywere mining
Present perfect
I, you, we, theyhave been mining
he, she, ithas been mining
Past perfect
I, you, he, she, it, we, theyhad been mining
Future
I, you, he, she, it, we, theywill be mining
Future perfect
I, you, he, she, it, we, theywill have been mining
> View Less