English version

mock

From Longman Dictionary of Contemporary Englishmockmock1 /mɒk $ mɑːk/ ●○○ verb 🔊 🔊 1 [intransitive, transitive] formalMAKE FUN OF to laugh at someone or something and try to make them look stupid by saying unkind things about them or by copying them syn make fun of 🔊 Opposition MPs mocked the government’s decision. 🔊 ‘Running away?’ he mocked. 🔊 It’s easy for you to mock, but we put a lot of work into this play.RegisterMock something or someone is used especially in literature. In everyday English, people usually say make fun of something or someone: Stop making fun of the way he talks!2 [transitive] formalSHOW/BE A SIGN OF to make something seem completely useless 🔊 Violent attacks like this mock the peace process.mocking adjective 🔊 Her tone was mocking.mockingly adverb 🔊 His lips twisted mockingly.mocker noun [countable]THESAURUSmock formal to laugh at and say unkind things about a person, institution, belief etc, to show that you do not have a high opinion of them. Mock is a formal word – in everyday English people usually say make fun ofThe press mocked his attempts to appeal to young voters.She was mocked by other pupils in her class. You shouldn’t mock the afflicted! (=you should not make fun of people who cannot help having problems – used especially ironically, when really you think it is funny too)make fun of somebody/something to make someone or something seem stupid by making unkind jokes about themPeter didn’t seem to realize that they were making fun of him.It used to be fashionable to make fun of the European Parliament. laugh at somebody/something to make unkind or funny remarks about someone or something, because they seem stupid or strangeI don’t want the other kids to laugh at me.People would laugh at the idea nowadays.poke fun at somebody/something to make someone or something seem silly by making jokes about them, especially in a way that is funny but not really cruela TV series that regularly poked fun at the governmentHe’s in no position to poke fun at other people’s use of English!ridicule formal to make unkind remarks that make someone or something seem stupidCatesby ridiculed his suggestion.His ideas were widely ridiculed at the time.Scientists ridiculed him for doubting the existence of the greenhouse effect.deride formal to make remarks that show you think that something is stupid or useless – often used when you think that the people who do this are wrongSome forms of alternative medicine – much derided by doctors – have been shown to help patients.the system that Marxists previously derided as ‘bourgeois democracy’ mock something ↔ up→ See Verb table
Examples from the Corpus
mock"Ooh, aren't you clever!'' she mocked.Lillian was openly mocked for her skinny body.The stark barrenness of the room mocked her as prickly thoughts needled her.Explicit? she mocked herself, yeah and why ever not?Liz mocked him, saying that he was a coward.The press mocked his attempts to appeal to young voters.You mustn't mock -- it's not their fault they don't know much about art.We are tired of criminals mocking our justice system with technicalities.He was not, however, mocking Sammler.It would be mocked, scorned, spurned.Frank was convinced of his arguments and fought bitterly with Tom, another academic, when he mocked the whole system.
mockmock2 adjective [only before noun] 🔊 🔊 1 ARTIFICIALnot real, but intended to be very similar to a real situation, substance etc 🔊 war games with mock battles 🔊 a mock interview 🔊 mock marble floors2 mock surprise/horror/indignation etc
Examples from the Corpus
mockOur mock ad on page 67 shows you what to look for.His statement was greeted with cries of mock astonishment and indignation by Tory back-benchers.a mock combat missionMock court sessions help people to understand the judicial process."It's not fair, '' he complained, pulling at his hair in mock distress. "I really wanted to visit your parents!''Every two weeks or so we do a mock draft.He rolled them on the floor, growling in mock fury, and they giggled.Diana gave her cousin a look of mock horror and then disappeared through the door, smiling.Their mocking laughter followed me out of the room, and echoed down the hall.More than a dozen activists have locked themselves inside a mock prison cell they put up outside the federal Interior Ministry here.Mike shook his head in mock regret; catching my eye, he gave me his wink.Alston videotaped the man in a mock sales presentation to show how he looked to other people when he refused to listen.About this time, there was a family funeral - with all the mock solemnity and grandeur of a cockney day out.The grey eyes widened in mock surprise. "How unusual to meet you here, '' she said sarcastically."He won't do it -- he hasn't got the guts!'' said a mocking voice from behind.
mockmock3 noun 🔊 🔊 1 mocks2 make mock of somebodymock-mock- /mɒk $ mɑːk/ prefix 🔊 1 PRETENDused to show that an attitude or feeling is pretended, not real 🔊 a mock-serious expression 🔊 His frown was mock-severe.2 ARTIFICIALcopying a particular style, especially a style of building 🔊 a mock-Tudor house
Examples from the Corpus
mock-Sarah had a mock-serious expression on her face.
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Verb table
mock
Simple Form
Present
I, you, we, theymock
he, she, itmocks
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Past
I, you, he, she, it, we, theymocked
Present perfect
I, you, we, theyhave mocked
he, she, ithas mocked
Past perfect
I, you, he, she, it, we, theyhad mocked
Future
I, you, he, she, it, we, theywill mock
Future perfect
I, you, he, she, it, we, theywill have mocked
> View Less
Continuous Form
Present
Iam mocking
he, she, itis mocking
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you, we, theyare mocking
Past
I, he, she, itwas mocking
you, we, theywere mocking
Present perfect
I, you, we, theyhave been mocking
he, she, ithas been mocking
Past perfect
I, you, he, she, it, we, theyhad been mocking
Future
I, you, he, she, it, we, theywill be mocking
Future perfect
I, you, he, she, it, we, theywill have been mocking
> View Less