English version

more

From Longman Dictionary of Contemporary Englishmoremore1 /mɔː $ mɔːr/ ●●● S1 W1 adverb  1 [used before an adjective or adverb to form the comparative]MORE THAN something OR somebody ELSE having a particular quality to a greater degree opp less You’ll have to be more careful next time. Can’t it be done more quickly?much/a lot/far more Children generally feel much more confident working in groups.more ... than It was a lot more expensive than I had expected. Your health is more important than anything else. Children can often do these puzzles more easily than adults. Selling goods abroad is no more difficult (=not more difficult) than selling to the home market.GRAMMAR: ComparativesMore is not used before the -er form of an adjective or adverb. You say: The train is quicker than the bus. Don’t say: The train is more quicker.2 MORE THAN BEFOREused to say that something happens a greater number of times or for longer opp less I promised Mum that I’d help more with the housework. You need to get out of the house more.more than Children are using the library more than they used to. He travels around a lot more now that he has a car.3 MORE/EXTRAused to say that something happens to a greater degree opp less She cares a lot more for her dogs than she does for me.more than It’s his manner I dislike, more than anything else.4 more and more5 more or less6 once more7 not anymore8 more than happy/welcome/likely etc9 the more ..., the more/the less ...10 be more something than something11 more than a little12 no more does/has/will etc somebody13 no more ... than more often than not at often(5), → more fool you/him etc at fool1(7), → that’s more like it/this is more like it at like1(11)
Examples from the Corpus
moreI couldn't agree more.In all cases the depth of knowledge required should be more advanced than that required for Professional Examinations.More and more, we are finding that students lack basic skills when they enter college.People are using mobile phones more because they are cheaper.Determinedly she put her worries and the root cause of her despondency behind her and tried to think more cheerfully.This suggests to Ishmael that the entire universe is more closely interrelated than man has yet admitted.You can see the buildings from the ground, of course, but they look more dramatic from the air.People here are far more friendly than they are in England.She's more intelligent than her brothers.I think you look more like your aunt Margaret than your sister does.The old version of Tomb Raider was a lot more limited in scope than this one.Can it be done more quickly?Windows 95 users have a newer and more reliable program called DriveSpace.Our future competitiveness and prosperity depend more than ever before on technology and industry.Visitors to the centre complained about the service more than last year.Anthony needs to practise more than the other students, but he gets it right in the end.Add more warm water if mixture is dry.I promised Mom I'd help more with the housework.much/a lot/far moreAnd you will weep a lot more, before things are over.As these few highlights suggest, there is a lot more to nothing than meets the eye.He had a lot more company this time.I had suggested some new tropical disease was a far more likely explanation.On a far more extensive scale than we have done hitherto, we must help refugees in their own and neighbouring countries.The system allows a lot more flexibility in the way the fireplace can be placed in the house.This means more work, but it also gives us a lot more flexibility.When the band became serious, I thought this is a far more contemporary and interesting way to make an artistic statement.more thanIt was a lot more expensive than I had expected.There were more accidents on the highways this year than last year.She cares more for her dogs than she does for me.They haven't been gone more than two or three days.We'd like to see our grand-daughter more than we do.a lot moreAnd I think I know a lot more about myself.In his final year, Babbitt got a lot more aggressive about preserving the nation's wild places.That was a lot more exposure than one would get from some old paint.They stayed friends all through the next ten years, and I find that a lot more interesting than a simple affair.Well, it's a lot more interesting than that.The answer seems to be that there is a lot more looking than investing.This can cause loss of control, or at least a lot more work for the controller.
moremore2 ●●● S1 W1 determiner, pronoun [comparative of ‘many’ and ‘much’]  1 MORE THAN A NUMBER OR AMOUNTa greater amount or number opp less, fewer We should spend more on health and education.more (...) than More people are buying new cars than ever before.much/a lot/far more Diane earns a lot more than I do.more than 10/100 etc Our plane took off more than two hours late. More than a quarter of the students never finished their courses.more of Viewers want better television, and more of it. Perhaps next year more of us will be able to afford holidays abroad.2 MORE/EXTRAan additional number or amount opp less I really am interested. Tell me more. We need five more chairs.a little/many/some/any more Can I have a little more time to finish? Are there any more sandwiches? I have no more questions.more of You’d better take some more of your medicine. Don’t waste any more of my time.3 more and more4 not/no more than something5 the more ..., the more/the less ...6 be more of something than something7 no more than8 (and) what’s more9 no more something more’s the pity at pity1(4)THESAURUSmore in addition to an amount or numberCan I have some more coffee?I have one more question. It only costs a few dollars more.further [only before noun] formal as well as the ones that you have already mentionedShe will remain in hospital for further tests.They waited for a further two hours.supplementary formal in addition to the main part of somethingSupplementary information is available on request.a supplementary questionsupplementary incomeextra in addition to the usual or standard cost, time, amount etcThey let the kids stay up an extra hour.Some stores charge extra for delivery.Postage is extra.additional [only before noun] more than the basic amount or the amount that you expected or agreed. Additional is more formal than extraAn evening job would provide additional income.There may be an additional charge for paying bills by credit card.
Examples from the Corpus
much/a lot/far moreAnd you will weep a lot more, before things are over.As these few highlights suggest, there is a lot more to nothing than meets the eye.He had a lot more company this time.I had suggested some new tropical disease was a far more likely explanation.On a far more extensive scale than we have done hitherto, we must help refugees in their own and neighbouring countries.The system allows a lot more flexibility in the way the fireplace can be placed in the house.This means more work, but it also gives us a lot more flexibility.When the band became serious, I thought this is a far more contemporary and interesting way to make an artistic statement.a little/many/some/any moreFeel a strong stretch in the left calf-if you don't, move body forward a little more.And we need to be a little more aggressive physically.If virtually nothing is known of the town defences, only a little more can be said about the streets.Night Train Express is a little more expensive.People are relaxing a little more in their wardrobes and the way they do business.Only a little more indirect is the effect of the same cuckoo genes on the behaviour of the besotted host.I thought he was a little more settled tonight, he was more in control.One protest site is in a parking lot a little more than a block away from the United Center.
Pictures of the day
Do you know what each of these is called?
Click on the pictures to check.