English version

more than a little

From Longman Dictionary of Contemporary Englishmore than a littlemore than a littleVERY formal fairly The lectures were more than a little disappointing. more
Examples from the Corpus
more than a littleLove: the word would be utterly meaningless in this context; no more than a little blast of sound.He was more than a little disappointed that his son was not athletic.The ex-boyfriend is more than a little interested.Many of these ideas depend more than a little on what you believe in.It may be no more than a little park near work or a church that you stop by during lunch hour.Gordon was, he admitted, more than a little relieved.Educators, meanwhile, often view business with more than a little suspicion, distrust, and envy.
Pictures of the day
Do you know what each of these is called?
Click on the pictures to check.