Longman Dictionary of Contemporary English homepage

more

2 determiner, pronoun
     
more2 S1 W1 [comparative of 'many' and 'much']
1 a greater amount or number [≠ less, fewer]:
We should spend more on health and education.
more (...) than
More people are buying new cars than ever before.
much/a lot/far more
Diane earns a lot more than I do.
more than 10/100 etc
Our plane took off more than two hours late.
More than a quarter of the students never finished their courses.
more of
Viewers want better television, and more of it.
Perhaps next year more of us will be able to afford holidays abroad.
2 an additional number or amount [≠ less]:
I really am interested. Tell me more.
We need five more chairs.
a little/many/some/any more
Can I have a little more time to finish?
Are there any more sandwiches?
I have no more questions.
more of
You'd better take some more of your medicine.
Don't waste any more of my time.
3

more and more

an increasing number or amount [≠ less and less]:
More and more people are moving to the cities.
4

not/no more than something

used to emphasize that a particular number, amount, distance etc is not large:
It's a beautiful cottage not more than five minutes from the nearest beach.
Opinion polls show that no more than 30% of people trust the government.
5

the more ..., the more/less ...

used to say that if an amount of something increases, another change happens as a result:
It always seems like the more I earn, the more I spend.
6

be more of something than something

to be one thing rather than another:
It was more of a holiday than a training exercise.
7

no more than

a) used to say that something is not too much, but exactly right or suitable:
It's no more than you deserve.
Eline felt it was no more than her duty to look after her husband.
b) also little more than used to say that someone or something is not very great or important:
He's no more than a glorified accountant.
He left school with little more than a basic education.
8

(and) what's more

used to add more information that emphasizes what you are saying:
I've been fortunate to find a career that I love and, what is more, I get well paid for it.
9

no more something

used to say that something will or should no longer happen:
No more dreary winters - we're moving to Florida.

➔ more's the pity

at pity1 (4)

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