Longman Dictionary of Contemporary English homepage

most

1 adverb
     
most1 S1 W1
1 [used before an adjective or adverb to form the superlative] having the greatest amount of a particular quality [≠ least]:
She's one of the most experienced teachers in the district.
The most important thing is to stay calm.
A recent study showed that gardening is easily the most popular activity among the over 50s.
We shall find out which system works most effectively.
It is the kind of tea most often served in Chinese restaurants.
2 to a greater degree or more times than anything else:
What annoyed him most was the way she wouldn't even listen.
I guess the food I eat most is pasta.
Most of all, I just felt sad that it was over.
3 [+adjective/adverb] formal very:
Thank you for a most interesting evening.
I was most surprised to hear of your engagement.
4 American English informal almost:
He plays poker most every evening.
GRAMMAR GRAMMAR

When you mean 'nearly all' use most, not the most Most pupils wanted to go to university (NOT The most pupils wanted to go to university). Use the most when you are comparing one person or thing with all others It was the most terrifying experience of my life. In spoken English, you can also use the most when you are talking about just two people or things Who's the most talented - Will or Gareth? but some users of English think that this use is incorrect and use the more instead Who is the more talented - Will or Gareth?!! Do not use most with the -est form of an adjective or adverb one of the hardest things to do (NOT one of the most hardest things to do)

Dictionary pictures of the day
Do you know what each of these is called?
What is the word for picture 1? What is the word for picture 2? What is the word for picture 3? What is the word for picture 4?
Click on any of the pictures above to find out what it is called.

Explore our topic dictionary