English version

mush

From Longman Dictionary of Contemporary English
Related topics: Food, Food, dish
mushmush1 /mΚŒΚƒ/ noun πŸ”Š πŸ”Š 1 [singular, uncountable]DFSUBSTANCE an unpleasant soft substance, especially food, which is partly liquid and partly solid πŸ”Š The boiled vegetables had turned to mush. πŸ”Š She trudged through the mush of fallen leaves.2 β†’ turn/go to mush3 [uncountable] American EnglishDFF a thick porridge made from cornmeal4 [uncountable]LOVE a book, film etc that is about love and is sentimental πŸ”Š poetry and mush like that
Examples from the Corpus
mushβ€’ This is a love story, with a lot more going for it than slush and mush.β€’ I watched the others to see how to scoop up the gluey mush with my hand.β€’ As I said earlier, at first sight it looks like a grey mush.β€’ Cook the squash until it's soft, but not mush.β€’ Two children followed with a pot of mush cooling and thinning in the rain.β€’ Buffalo men, they called them, and talked slowly to the prisoners scooping mush and tapping away at their chains.β€’ But boiling the grain was a laborious process and produced an unpalatable mush.β€’ Helen, feeding the old woman mush on a spoon.turned to mushβ€’ All this quickness of mind, all her decisiveness had turned to mush when Mac came on the scene.β€’ The parking lot had turned to mush in the rain.
mushmush2 /mΚŠΚƒ/ noun British English πŸ”Š πŸ”Š 1 INSULT spoken informal used to speak to someone in an angry way πŸ”Š Oi, mush! Get your hands off my car!2 [countable] British English informal someone’s face or mouth πŸ”Š I didn’t want to see his ugly mush ever again.
Examples from the Corpus
mushβ€’ This is a love story, with a lot more going for it than slush and mush.β€’ As I said earlier, at first sight it looks like a grey mush.β€’ Helen, feeding the old woman mush on a spoon.
mushmush3 /mΚŒΚƒ/ interjection πŸ”Š πŸ”Š used to tell a team of dogs that pull a sledge over snow to start moving
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